Prudence Jackson

Descendants of Prudence Jackson

Generation No. 1

 

1.  Prudence3 Jackson (George2, John1) was born 25 January 1789 in (West) Virginia, and died 21 January 1855 in Weston, Lewis County, (West) Virginia. Burial: Aft. 24 January 1855, Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. Her tombstone reads: Prudence J. wife of Elijah Arnold was born in Harrison County, Virginia A. D. 1789 died June 21, 1855 in the 68 year of her age “To the righteous death has no terrors”.  (James Ralston reading of the Hill Cemetery,, HCPD)

She married Elijah Arnold 13 March 1814 in Zanesville, Muskingum County, Ohio, son of Isaac Arnold and Mary Porter.  He was born 1771 in Fauquier County, Virginia, and died 08 December 1849 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. Tombstone: died in 78 year of his life “It is appointed unto all men to die”.

***

Land Records:

“On Dec. 20, 1799, a grant was issued to George Jackson which was by far the most important and largest of the patents in Collins Settlement, and which marked the beginning of the settlement in this region.  The survey upon which this is based is dated Oct. 26, 1798 and the grant is issued ‘for the ancient composition of four shillings sterling’ ”.  (Collins Settlement of Old, p. 14.)

George Jackson transferred a square mile embracing the site of Jacksonville to his daughter, Prudence Jackson Arnold, wife of Elijah Arnold.  This was in the early part of 1824 but the Arnolds in person did not occupy the land until 1830. (Collins Settlement of Old)

***

Tribute:

The following tribute to Prudence and Elijah was probably written by their great-granddaughter Mary Prudence (McClellen) O’Hara, daughter of John Harper McClellen and Floride Arnold.

“The marriage took place in 1814.  Elijah Arnold was prepared to escort his bride, a tall stately brunette, to her new home in grand style. His handsome carriage, with its silver trapping and many outriders, had four magnificent blooded horses to draw it. On their way to Virginia they made a stop in Clarksburg and visited at the stately home of the bride’s brother, John G. Jackson. This visit was long remembered by the people of Clarksburg on account of the magnificent appearance of the groom and the splendor of his equipage.  The like of which had never been seen in Clarksburg before.

Elijah Arnold was a planter and merchant, having inherited a great fortune from both his father, Isaac Arnold, and his mother, who was Mary Porter, the eldest child of Samuel Porter.

Prudence married Elijah Arnold in 1814 and he was prepared to escort his bride, a tall stately brunette, to her new home in grand style. His handsome carriage, with its silver trappings and many outriders, had four magnificent blooded horses to draw it. On their way to Virginia they made a stop in Clarksburg and visited at the stately home of the bride’s brother, John George Jackson. This visit was long remembered by the people of Clarksburg on account of the magnificent appearance of the groom and the splendor of his equipage. The like of which had never been seen in Clarksburg before.

Elijah Arnold was born in Fauquier County, Virginia in 1772.  He was a planter and a merchant.  Having inherited a great fortune from both his father, Isaac Arnold, and his mother, who was Mary Porter, the eldest child of Samuel Porter.

In [1824] Col. George Jackson gave his daughter Prudence one mile square, or 640 acres, of his wild land in Collins Settlement. A certain portion of which was “to be laid off in town lots and sold for the benefit of my daughter Prudence.”  The town was to be called Jacksonville.  December 1825, she sold [many] acres of this land to Henry Camden.  Soon after this Elijah Arnold lost his large estate.  He had been going security for relatives and friends, and was obliged to pay their debts. Everything was lost.  Even the property of the deed of gift and although many years were lost in trying to regain her dower, Prudence Jackson was never able to recover anything.

In 1827 they moved to Clarksburg.  About 1830 they moved to “Collins settlement” where they built a two-story log house. A village soon sprung up and in [1858] the name was changed to Jacksonville. This log house, which is still standing, was white washed and called by the settlers for miles around the “Big White House.”

Elijah Arnold was tall, of fine carriage, was considered by many as one of the handsomest men of that day.  He was very literary and spent the remaining years of his life among his books and papers.

Prudence Jackson seemed to have possessed a strong character evidently she inherited much from her grandmother, Elizabeth Cummins. The following item is taken from her obituary, “She was a woman of strong intellect and possessed much useful and practical information.”  At the time of their moving to Collins Settlement the county was but sparsely settled, and very little of the county had been cleared of woods.  The Arnold boys were young and to encourage them their mother would take her knitting to the clearing and sit there, while they worked. She held high ambitions for her children, and did much towards helping them in their several achievements.

In the fall of each year it was customary for Elijah Arnold to make an annual visit to Virginia, so that he might attend mass of the Roman Catholic Church at Winchester, of which he was a member. On his return from one of these visits he stopped in Weston to visit his son, William Edward Arnold, was taken ill and died [of ‘Gravel” states Lewis County, (W)V Mortality Schedule, 1850] on December 8, 1849, and is buried in the old Arnold cemetery [near end of Arnold Street, Weston, WV]

Some time after his death Prudence (Jackson) Arnold moved to Weston and made her home with her unmarried son, George Jackson [Arnold].  Although at the time he invited her to come and live with him, she remarked that ‘yes’ she would come to his house to live, but that hereafter it was to be her home and the he could live with her.  There she died June 21, 1855, and was laid to rest at the side of her husband. The Collins Settlement land which she inherited from her father she gave to her sons. [i]

Children of Prudence Jackson and Elijah Arnold are:

+      2                 i.    George Jackson4 Arnold, born Bet. 1815 – 1816 in Fauquier or Culpepper County, Virginia; died Bet. 16 – 26 September 1899 in Arnold, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      3                ii.    Mary Elizabeth Arnold, born 06 December 1819 in Fauquier or Culpepper County, Virginia; died 01 October 1907 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      4               iii.    William Edward Arnold, born 10 April 1817 in Culpepper County, Virginia; died 30 April 1890 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      5               iv.    Porter Mandeville Arnold, born Bet. 04 March 1821 – 1822 in Fauquier County, Virginia; died 22 November 1861 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      6                v.    Sarah Catherine Arnold, born 01 May 1824 in Fauquier County, Virginia; died 29 June 1911 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      7               vi.    John George Arnold, born 01 February 1826 in Fauquier County, Virginia; died 30 October 1907 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      8              vii.    Harriet Ann Arnold, born 23 October 1831 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 02 November 1911 in probably Upshur County, West Virginia.

+      9             viii.    Henrietta Jane “Hattie“, born March 1833 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 21 March 1912 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

 

Generation No. 2

 

2.  George Jackson4 “Old Jack” Arnold (Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 16 March 1816 in Fauquier or Culpepper County, Virginia, and died 26 September 1899 in Arnold, Lewis County, West Virginia, on Old Indian Farm. Burial: Aft. 26 September 1899, Machpelah Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. He married (2) Angaline “Anna” Swick1 03 August 1865 in Savannah, Mason County, Illinois2.  She was born 21 July 1847 in possibly Gilmer County, (West) Virginia, and died 01 December 1887 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia, at home of Bright’s disease3. Burial: Aft. 01 December 1887, Machpelah Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia

Legend is that George sent Anna to Illinois for an education and they were married in that state.

In 1830, when only 14 years old, George Jackson Arnold moved with his parents to Old Collins Settlement now Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia. In his youth, he was a famous hunter, a great mower and a champion cradler.  He once cradled seven acres of oats for William Bennett in one day.

Later he taught school in a log house near Jacksonville. In 1848, he was admitted to the bar and formed a large law practice in Weston. He was elected Prosecuting Attorney of Lewis County in 1852 and again in 1856. In 1861 he was elected to the Legislature of Virginia. The Civil War coming on George J. Arnold, being opposed to secession, went as a delegate to Wheeling in July, 1861, where the Legislature of the Restored Government of Virginia was in session. He was placed on the committee to prepare a bill for the formation of a new state and gave the movement his hearty support. He was the draughtsman of the bill that gave the country the new state of West Virginia.

George J. Arnold retired to private life after West Virginia was made a State remaining in his law practice and farming and stock raising until 1878 when he was elected to the House of Delegates of West Virginia.  Around 1880, he started a store and “The Indian Farm Hotel” at Arnold, Lewis County, WV.  The Hotel became a central freight station with stock pens for the B & O Railroad and was known as Arnold Station.  In his time, he was one of the largest landowners and cattle grazers in WV.[ii]

*****

 

SKETCH ON GEORGE JACKSON ARNOLD

by his grandson, Raymond Arnold, May 31, 1981

 

“My grandfather, George Jackson Arnold, born in Virginia in 1816, died September 16, 1899. Married Ann Swick born in Gilmer County, West Virginia, in 1846. Born to this union eight children; Porter, Genevieve A. Brown, Maude a. Gillin, Mary A. Williams, Jackson Arnold, George F. Arnold, Floria A. Gorrell, and Amie who died real young.  Porter married Bennie Alkire, had five children. Eugenia A. Smith, one child a girl; Margaret A., never married; Elizabeth A. married, one daughter; John Porter married, four children, two boys; Sam A. married, two children, one boy and one girl.  Genevieve A. Brown married, no children.  Mary A. Williams married, no children.  Jackson Arnold married, one adopted son.  George F. married, two boys and two girls.  Floria A.  Gorrell, three sons.  Amie died young.

Grandma Swick Arnold had four or five older brothers.  Grandpa Arnold induced her father to move to his farm at Arnold, W. Va. To help clear the land of the forest.  He deeded them some land and helped build them a log house.  To this day, that certain meadow is know as the Swick meadow.  He fell in love with her, put her through one of the best eastern colleges of the day and married her.  She was thirty years younger than he and died first.  He had three children before he married her.  Their last names were Hall, Allman and Harris.  The Harris boy died at the age of seventeen.  All the three mothers were given land by him.

The only relative of Grandma Swick I ever knew was my Aunt Lida Hight.  Then she was near 60-70 years old.  She lived at our home a short while.  A small frail person, her mind was so alert and such a pretty face.

In 1940 when I was taking the farm population census in the western edge of Lewis County, W. Va., I talked to a man who had bought his farm from Grandpa Arnold, and built a log house and was to pay for it with grain (wheat, oats, or corn) he would raise after clearing the land of the forest each year.  One year on account of the terrible drought his crop was a near failure.  Either no payment that year or pay and nothing to eat.  He decided to go to Grandpa Arnold and see.  Grandpa said to him. “Forget the payment this year and go ahead next year.”

Another on Grandpa Arnold: a group of “shyster” men from New Your City were bringing suit claiming thousands of acres of land in W. Va. Counties of Braxton, Webster, and Nicholas and maybe others.  Some of the W.Va. men got together and decided to send a man to see Grandpa Arnold and did on horseback.  He told Grandpa his story and Grandpa Arnold said for him to go back home and tell the others not to worry, that he would take care.  They never lost any of their land.

The “grain” story I’m sure is true and the land scandal I feel sure is true, too.

Porter Arnold’s children living: Eugenia, Margaret, Elizabeth, and Sam.

Maude A. Gillin: 2 children – son died young, about 17, and Eleanor Short.  Eleanor is dead leaving 3 daughters. (2 are twins)

George F. Arnold – born, Oct. 4, 1877, died January 19, 1919: 4 children, 2 living: Evelyn Simmons and Raymond N. Arnold.”

 

*****

Obit:

HON. GEORGE JACKSON ARNOLD

      “This old and respected citizen died 26th of September 1899, at his home, “The Indian Farm” at Arnold.  Born in Culpepper County, Virginia, on March the 16th, 1815, he had attained the advanced age of 84 1/2 years.  His father was Elijah Arnold, his mother, Prudence Jackson, a sister of Judge John G. Jackson, of Clarksburg, a distinguished member of Congress and Federal Judge in the early part of this century.  Mr. Arnold’s family moved to Lewis County in 1830, and settled in the forest at the point called Collins Settlement, now Jacksonville.  That entire section was then a wilderness.  His father died in 1849, leaving him to be the strong oak of the family.  Beginning life a poor young man, he hewed his own way and accumulated a large estate.  Admitted to the bar in 1848, for many years he enjoyed a large law practice and became a lawyer of prominence. Strong natural sense and discrimination characterized his mind.  Having acquired valuable lands on the West Fork, he was for years the largest cattle grazier in Lewis County, and retired from the practice of the law to his farm years ago.  Though wealthy, he was not proud or haughty, but plain and unostentatious, freely associating with the masses of the people.  He lent the helping hand to many a needy one.  The old pioneers, who leveled the forest that once covered our fair fields held him in high esteem. He was twice elected Prosecuting Attorney, and in the troublous times of 1861, was elected from Lewis County to the Virginia Legislature, and the Civil War coming on, took his seat in the Union Legislature under the Restored Government of Virginia, at Wheeling.  In 1878, he was elected to the West Virginia Legislature.  Always an affectionate father no call from his family was unheeded by him.  Mr. Arnold was a firm, courageous man and had no fear of death.  He even erected a monument for himself and family in Machpelah Cemetery years ago.  He approached death in full consciousness, declaring that he was willing, even preferred to go, saying that he had done a faithful part by his family, had lived out a long life, and could no longer be of any use to them.   He did not repine over his approaching end.  The long life of toil and care is over.

Thus has passed away a worthy self-made man, who from an early date of Lewis County, has been deeply and closely identified with its people.  For its people he always cherished and expressed a very warm regard, and his host of friends will long and kindly remember George Jackson Arnold.”  (“Weston Democrat”, Sept. 30, 1899)  A Friend

 

LOCALS:  Same issue

“A large crowd from Weston attended the funeral service of Hon. George J. Arnold, at Arnold Thursday afternoon, and upon the arrival of the train there, quite a number of the friends of the deceased were found congregated from the surrounding country.  Rev. W. H.. Burkhardt, of the Episcopal church, conducted the service.”

 

“A special train on Thursday carried a number of relatives and friends to Arnold, where the funeral services of the late George J. Arnold took place.  On its return trip with the remains the train stopped here and took on board a large number of our people who attended the interment at Machpelah at 3 o’clock in the afternoon.”

*****

      Before George J. Arnold was married to Anna Swick, he fathered three children form three different women – Susan Wheeler, Mrs. Amy/Ora (Means) Batten and a Miss Harris.  The Harris boy died at the age of seventeen.  In 1872, George gave land “for natural love and affection and one dollar” to his two daughters, Virginia L. Batten and Amanda Jane Arnold.  Virginia’s mother Amy Means married Richard Batten in 1836 and Virginia L. Batten was born 1836 and Virginia L. Batten was born in 18 November 1840.  Virginia married George W. Allman in 1860.  Legend tells us that Susan Wheeler’s daughter Amanda Jane was raised by her grandmother Prudence Arnold and other members of the family.  Amanda Jane Arnold (b. 15 March 1841 Lewis County, WV; d. 16 December 1881 Lewis County, West Virginia, buried Hall Cemetery, Abram’s Run, Lewis County, West Virginia): m. on 15 March 1861 Lewis County, West Virginia; d. 30 March 1912 Abram’s Run, Lewis County, West Virginia, buried same Hall Cemetery.) John was a younger brother of Joseph Hall who married George’s sister Mary Elizabeth Arnold.

 

Child of George Jackson Arnold is:

+      10               i.    Amanda Jane5 Arnold, born 15 March 1841 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 16 December 1881 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

Children of George Arnold and Angaline Swick are:

+      11               i.    Porter M.5 Arnold, born 25 October 1866 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 26 May 1959 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

12              ii.    Ada Arnold, born 02 August 1868 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 02 October 1871 in Lewis County, West Virginia. She died at age 3y2m20d. Burial: Aft. 02 October 1871, Machpelah Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia

13             iii.    Genevieve Arnold, born Abt. 1869 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married Brown Aft. 1900. Res. Washington, DC.

14               iv.    Mary D’Arcy Arnold, born Abt. 1872 in West Virginia; died 31 October 1900 in Denver, Colorado4. She married John W. Williams; died 21 January 1901 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. Both buried Machpelah Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia

Newspaper article:  November 10, 1900

Mrs. Mary Arnold Williams

A telegram was received in Weston on Thursday of last week announcing the death of Mrs. John Williams, nee Miss Mary Arnold, at Denver, Colorado, on Wednesday.  She was 29 years of age and was the daughter of the late Hon. George J. Arnold, and a sister of Messrs. Porter, Jackson and George Arnold, of this county, and Mrs. Lee Gorrell, of Sutton.  In March, 1893, she was married to Mr. John Williams, a brother of Mrs. Chas. B. Goodwin of this place and resided in Alexander, Upshur county until June of  last year. when her husband’s ill health required him to go to a milder climate on the Pacific slope.  Remaining at her father’s home until December, and being herself in bad health, the young wife followed her husband across the Continent to Los Angeles, California, the city of sunshine and flowers, whose climate of perpetual summer is always tempared by the soft breezes of the Pacific Ocean.  Here they rested during the winter waiting for longed for return of health; but it did not come, and once more they turned their faces toward the East, going now to the beautiful city of Denver, situated in the high altitude of the Rocky Mountains.  Mrs. Williams health becoming worse later, her two sisters, Misses Genevieve and Maude Arnold, went to Denver to watch by her bedside; but on October 31st, two days after their arrival, she died, and her sisters started on the long homeward journey with the remains of their beloved sister to Weston, the place of her birth, to lay her body beside her father and mother in the Machpelah Cemetery

A pathetic incident connected with the death of this young woman was that her husband’s health was so precarious as to prevent him from returning with his wife’s remains, and he was compelled to content himself with a farewell look at her face cold in death, and entrust her body to the watchful care of her faithful sisters.  At Cincinnati they were met by Jackson Arnold, their brother, who returned with them to Weston, where the funeral took place on Sunday from the residence of John G. Arnold, an uncle of the deceased.  Reverend Grinnan of the Episcopal Church, conducted the funeral services.

 

“Let us think that her dying eyes read a mystic meaning which only the rapt and parting soul may know.  Let us believe that in the silence of the receding world she heard the great waves breaking on a farther shore and fleet already upon her wasted brow the breath of the eternal morning.

A Friend”

 

+      15              v.    Maude A. Arnold, born Abt. 1874 in West Virginia.

+      16             vi.    Jackson Arnold, born 16 September 1875 in West Virginia; died 06 June 1993 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      17            vii.    George F. A. Arnold, born 02 November 1877 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 11 January 1919.

18           viii.    Floyd Arnold, born Abt. 1879.

19             ix.    Florence “Florrie” Arnold, born Aft. 1879 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married (1) Howard Elmer Williams.  She married (2) Lee Gorrell Bef. 1937.

 

3.  Mary Elizabeth4 Arnold (Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 06 December 1819 in Fauquier or Culpepper County, Virginia, and died 01 October 1907 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia5.  She married Joseph Hall 09 December 1844 in Lewis County, West Virginia6, son of Jonathan Hall and Elizabeth Reger.  He was born 18 January 1820 in Skin Creek, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died Bet. 02 – 03 February 1885 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia. Both buried Hall Cemetery, Gordon Hall Farm, Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia. This Hall cemetery and the old Hall homestead at Roanoke were destroyed to make room for the Stonewall Jackson Lake.  The graves and stones were moved by the Army Corp of Engineers to the Forest Lawn cemetery.  They are facing the entrance of the cemetery, the stone are the right most one close to the road.

 

Newspaper Article: June 4 1881: “Mrs. Joseph Hall was thrown from her horse Tuesday morning last causing compound fracture to her left limb.”

 

Obit: Death of Mrs. Elizabeth Hall

“Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Hall widow of Joseph Hall died at her home at Roanoke, Lewis County on Tuesday morning Oct. 1, 1907 at the advanced age of 87.  She was a sister of the late George J. Arnold, William E. Arnold and Porter M. Arnold and John G. Arnold.  Mrs. Catherine Hall, Mrs. John S.(Strother) Fisher of Buckhannon and Mrs. Henry Brannon.  She leaves surviving her the following children, John Hall of Richmond Va, Mrs. Anna Ramsey of Manchester Ohio, Mrs Mary Jones of Canada, Mrs. Helen Clark of Kansas, and Mrs. (Mr.) George W. Hall of this county with whom she spent her declining years and who faithly ministered to her unto the last.  Her youngest son Charles died some years ago in the west.  Mrs. Hall passed many years in widowhood.  In early life she united with Protestant Methodist Church and always lived a consistent Christian life.  She was a devoted and faithful wife and mother and a kind neighbor and her death though it came in the ripeness of age will be deeply lamented by her family and acquaintances.

 

Her name through a long life was one of high respectability and she left it untarnished.  She was a woman of strong mind and character.  Her last years were years of suffering incident to old age, but she bore up under it in peaceful composure and often expressed resignation and rediness to depart from her earthly tabernacle so frail, so worn with years.

 

But when the sun in all his state

Illumed the eastern skies

She passed through glorys morning gate

And Walked in Paradise.”

 

Obit: February 14, 1885 – Weston Democrat

“    Departed this life on Tuesday the 3rd of Feb. 1885 at his residence near Roanoke in the 65th year of age, Joseph Hall.

He married Elizabeth Arnold eldest sister of  Hons. George J. and William Edward Arnold in 1844, and it can truthfully be said there never were two person who lived more happily and independently then they did.  They had plenty of the goods which come by industry and their door was always open to generous hospitality.

They raised to manhood and womanhood 3 sons and 3 daughter and they and their mother survive him.

Joseph Hall was “an honest man” and died as he had lived a Christian gentleman, respected by all who knew him in life.

His stay on earth was peaceful and quiet and when ordered to appear before his maker, he met the summons with heroic fortitude.

By industry and an upright life he has left to those who succeed him a competency — and what to them is best of all–a good example, worthy to imitate.

 

(signed by A Neighbor) dated Feb. 9, 1885

 

Children of Mary Arnold and Joseph Hall are:

+      20               i.    Jonathan “John” Elijah5 Hall, born 18 February 1846 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 08 November 1914 in Atlee, Hanover County, Virginia.

21              ii.    Anzina “Anna” Hall, born 18 May 1848 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 02 June 1927 in Manchester, Ohio.  She married Robert Newton Ramsey 27 November 1884.

22             iii.    Mary C. Hall, born July 1859; died 19 January 1914 in Leo Province, Alberta, Canada7.  She married William Jones 14 February 1888 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      23             iv.    George William Hall, born 02 August 1853 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 1922 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      24              v.    Helen Eliza Hall, born 18 March 1857; died August 1900.

25             vi.    Charles C. Hall, born 04 July 1860 in Lewis County, West Virginia8; died Bef. 1907 in the west.

 

4.  William Edward4 Arnold (Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 10 April 1817 in Culpepper County, Virginia9, and died 30 April 1890 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  He married Susan Martin Wilson 10 May 1848 in Harrison County, (West) Virginia10, daughter of Col Josiah Martin.  She was born 13 April 1817 in Harrisonburg, Pennsylvania, and died 22 July 1899 in Lewis County, West Virginia. Both buried Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. She died of cancer at 72y3m9d. Her tombstone reads “I am the resurrection and the life.  He that believeth in me, Though he were dead Yet shall he live.”

William was an attorney in Weston, WV. He died of a cerebral hemorrhage at age 73y19d.

 

From Oliver Stories: “ I have given you a short and I know a very imperfect sketch of all the Sheriffs but one, the junior of the lot, I mean W. E. Arnold.  I would take him at that time to be about twenty-five years of age; in height about 6 feet, stood very erect, of fine proportion; a young man of great and lofty aspirations, determined to make his mark high up on the ladder of fame, industrious, persevering and a hard student, very neat and tasty in his appearance and dress.  He combined the study of law with the Sheriffaity.  He was a prompt collector, a good Sheriff and acquitted himself with honor to the people and much credit to himself. (Weston Democrat 20 Feb. 1892)

Living in the household in 1870 were the following black persons:  Margaret Brown age 40, born VA; servant; Willie, age 5, b. WV; Amy, age 8/12 b. WV and Lewis Branson, age 12, b. VA.

“Among the law-makers of the Old Commonwealth, who became legislators in the new, was the Hon. Wm. E. Arnold, a native of Culpepper county, Virginia, born, april 10, 1819.  After receiving a classical education he attended law school, and then settled in Weston, Lewis county, where he now resides.  Admitted to the Bar in 1846, he has since continued in the profession, except when serving his people in State offices.  Elected to the Virginia Legislature in 1857, he was active in the passage of the law locating the Hospital for the Insane at Weston.  He remained in that Legislature by re-election until 1861, serving during the time on the Committees of Courts of Justice and Lunatic Asylums.  A Union Democrat, believing that secession meant civil war, he espoused the cause of the whole Union and supported the government.  As a member of the West Virginia Legislature in 1877, he served on the Judiciary Committee, on Claims and Grievances, and on Roads and Internal Navigation.  He introduced a measure to raise by State aid ‘An Internal Improvement Fund to build roads throughout the Commonwealth.’  Retiring from official work, he has devoted his attention to law practice, banking, farming and grazing, by which he has amassed a fortune which he is enjoying with his family.”

 

Obit: July 29, 1899

“Mrs. Susan M. Arnold is Dead

That beautiful trait of the human character moving the living to mourn the dead, was fully exemplified in Weston when, on the 22nd day of July, 1899 the announcement was made that Mrs. Arnold was dead.  A year’ painful illness had given warning of her departure, yet when the end came it filled the hearts of her kindred and friends with deep grief and the whole of our people with sincere regret.

Susan M. Wilson married Hon. William E. Arnold 51 years ago last May, and ever since then she has lived in Weston, highly respected and esteemed by all its people.  She was the daughter of Col. Josiah D. Wilson, a prominent farmer of Harrison county who was also active in his day in the internal improvement of North Western Virginia.  She was the sister of ex-Congressman, Col. Benjamin Wilson.  She was the mother of eight children, five of whom died in infancy, and she leaves surviving her Mrs. Mary A. Edmiston, Mrs. Floride McClellan and Mr. Wilson A. Arnold.  Her dying bed was soothed by the tender presence of these children and her affectionate brother and sister, Col. Wilson and Mrs. Thorn, of Clarksburg.

I could scarcely say too much commendatory of this good woman.  To say that she was one of the most noble, faithful and devoted of wives, mothers and christians it a plain, but high and truthful eulogy.

Her long life since womanhood witnessed much bereavement and affliction. “She the cross of suffering bore”.  but she bore it with the firmness of a strong woman, the resignation of a devoted christian.  She heard the River of Death flowing out to the Great Son, yet she did not ask,

“Into the Silent Land!

Ah! who shall lead us thither”

She could say with Tennyson, “I hope to meet my Pilot face to face, when I have crossed the bar” and with David, “You, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me.”

Hers was a sweet and beautiful funeral and very large.  “Just as the sun went down” into the peaceful shade of the Sabbath summer evening, typical of her placid sleep, her remains were laid with those of her husband and children in Weston’s first cemetery, “God’s acre,” where the old fathers and mothers sleep.

 

“In the glory of the Sunset,

In the purple mists of Evening.

To the Islands of the Blessed,

To the Kingdom of Ponemah,

To the land of the Hereafter.”

 

Peace with with her

 

“Thus rest thy spirit still on those with whom, They selp the path of joyous

duty trode, Bidding them make an altar of thy tomb, Where ehasten’d thought

may offer praise to God.”

 

A Friend

Children of William Arnold and Susan Wilson are:

+      26               i.    Mary5 Arnold, born 08 March 1849 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 23 August 1925 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

27              ii.    Helen Arnold, born 07 March 1851 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 01 September 1851 in Lewis County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 01 September 1851, Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia

28             iii.    Allene Arnold, born 02 September 1852 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 05 November 1855 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. She died at age 3y2m3d of scarlet fever in Weston, father reporting.

+      29             iv.    Floride “Flodie” Arnold, born 02 July 1855 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 23 June 1919.

30              v.    Douglass Arnold, born 10 May 1856 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia; died December 1856 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. He died at age 7 months from a spinal infection, father reporting.  The cemetery reading conflicts with court house records.

31             vi.    William Edward Arnold, born 14 April 1859 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 02 May 1861 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. This child is listed a Edward, age 1, in the 1860 census with his parents.  He was listed in the birth records, but not in the death records and was not in the 1870 census for Lewis with parents. Burial: Abt. 02 May 1861, Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

32            vii.    Susan Arnold, born 22 November 1860 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 22 July 1862 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

33           viii.    Harriet Ann Arnold, born 31 July 1861 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 20 July 1862 in Lewis County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 22 July 1862, Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia

34             ix.    Adaline Arnold, born 19 December 1862 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 27 November 1933 in Jackson’s Mill, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      35              x.    Wilson A. Arnold, born 19 December 1862 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 27 November 1933 in Jackson’s Mill, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

5.  Porter Mandeville4 Arnold (Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born Bet. 04 March 1821 – 1822 in Fauquier County, Virginia, and died 22 November 1861 in Lewis County, West Virginia11. He married (1) Julia A. Stephenson.  She was born 1833 in Pendleton County, Virginia..  He married (2) Susan Jane Asbury Bef. 1849, daughter of John Ashbury and Leah.  She was born 1829 in Pruntytown, Taylor County, West Virginia, and died 03 July 1858 in Lewis County, West Virginia12. Porter and Susan are buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.

Porter was educated at Pruntytown College and until his death a merchant at Jacksonville. He was bushwhacked by Pierson during the Civil War and died at age 36y10m26d.

 

The following is part of a letter written to Roy Bird Cook from Prudence McClellan found in the Roy Bird Cook Collection, WVU, Colson Hall, Morgantown, WV.

 

Mr. Roy Cook

Huntington, W. Va.

 

Dear Roy:

Your letter just received.  Do not think that your are “Intruding” upon my time, for such is not the case.  I have, ever since a very small child, been interested in the local history of our county, and any information I can give you is but a pleasure to me.

As there was no Peter M. Arnold, but Porter Mandeville Arnold, and as he was the postmaster of Jacksonville from the date you mention until the time of his death, there certainly is an error in the record from the Post Office Department.  Porter M. Arnold lived in the two-story frame house to the left of the road as you enter the village coming from Weston.  He had his store just across the road from his home and kept the post office there.  At the present time, the post office has been done away with.  We have been on the Roanoke route #3 since 1914 or 1915.  I am quite sure that some of the original boxes used by the earliest postmasters were in use the summer of 1914.  At least they were antique enough to have dated back to 1821.

I was so glad to get a copy of the letter to you from Washington.  It was most interesting.  It was my grandfather, Wm. E. Arnold, who proposed the name “Roanoke” for the P.O. at Bush’s Mills, after Roanoke, Va.

When Mrs. Joseph Hall (Elizabeth Arnold Hall) began to sell lots at Bush’s Mills, her brother, Wm. E., said he wanted to name the town she was laying off, and that is how Roanoke got its name.  The B. & O. R. R. has tried to change it, but the inhabitants will not agree so the station is Roanville and the little old Post Office just across the road defiantly clings to Roanoke.

The Porter Arnold store is still standing, and is used every summer by Mrs. Mary Edmiston for her flourishing Sunday School.  The old building was first a store and post office, next a school, later a store again, then a dwelling, and now a Sunday School room, or Chapel.  In this building was held the first Institute in the state of West Virginia.  If you care for an account, I will be glad to get it for you from a cousin who attended it, and with the grading received here has been accepted as a teacher in several western states and at present is principal of one of the schools in Raton, New Mexico.

When the news reached Weston of the shooting of Uncle Porter Arnold, grandfather, Uncle Jack and Dr. Camden started for Jacksonville under a guard of soldiers appointed by the Northern Captain stationed here.  Some day I hope you may be able to show me Dr. Camden’s notes and the letter of Pierson’s of which I never heard.

The story given me of the shooting of Uncle Porter is as follows:

Mrs. Betsy Hogsette kept the “Jacksonville Tavern”.  The night of which I speak, Pierson and some of his men were there for supper.  After it was over, Pierson said he had a piece of work to do, and wanted men to help him.  His friends were not anxious to take part and tried to back out.  There was a great deal of bad whiskey passed around, and after drinking for some time, it was agreed all would go with him.  The “Tavern” stood to the left of Mrs. Floride McClellan’s farmhouse, and is owned by her.  From here Pierson went to the home of Mr. William Brake, at the corner of the Braxton and Walkersville roads, and called him to come out.  Next they went after Mr. Francis who lived in a little cottage to the left of Porter Arnold, and last for Porter Arnold.  On reaching the road the three men were ordered to march. They went up the Walkersville turnpike.  At a run a mile from the village, they were told to halt.  The order to fire was given.  Mr. Brake fell, killed instantly, was shot through the heart.  Mr. Francis feigned death, and later crawled to the riverbank and thus made his escape.  Porter Arnold was badly wounded.  He crawled up into a field, which was on his own land, inherited from him mother, and to a house where a tenant lived.  They took him in, and in the early morning carried him home.  Mr. Lute Smith, a member of the Confederate Cavalry under General Floyd, was at home at the time and assisted in removing the body of Mr. Brake.  He stated to me that Mr. Brake, Uncle Bill as he was called, had fallen with head down hill, and that the blood had so settled in his face that he was as black as a Negro.  Two of the men with Pierson that night were working for Mr. Robert Crawford who lived a half mile further on from the place where the shooting occurred, towards Walkersville.

The next morning after they had had time to think things over and were thoroughly scared, they went before Mr. Crawford, who was a Notary Public, and signed a paper stating that they had fired their guns into the air, and that it was the one and only time they had been with Pierson.  Mr. Smith, who was one of the persons who used to tell me of the “War times” was inclined to doubt the truth of their affidavit.

I also enclose copies of two letters from C. R. Harris who was one of the three commissioners appointed by Gov. Henry A. Wise of Virginia, to locate a site for the “Lunatic Asylum” as he called it, west of the Alleghany, and a copy of a letter from James Barbour a Virginia statesman.  Both letters speak for themselves.  In mentioning the Insane Asylum and how it was that Weston secured the institution, I hope that you will use this information in connection with my grandfather in your History of Lewis County.  He was a member of the Virginia Legislature at the time and made a hard fight to get the institution for Weston.  As you will see by Mr. Barbour’s letter, grandfather made the only speech that was made for it. He was never accorded credit for it.  Judge John Brannon and others taking it all to themselves.  Should you wish to see the original letters, I will be glad to show them to you any time you are in Weston.

The Mr. Wm Brake killed the same time as Uncle Porter was a relative of Prudence Jackson Arnold, through her mother, who was Elizabeth Brake. Just what the relationship was I have never found out. ..

 

Very Sincerely

 

Prudence McClellan

 

Editor’s Note: Elizabeth Brake Jackson w/o Col. George Jackson, mother of Prudence Jackson Arnold was the aunt of William Brake.  William Brake was the s/o Abraham and Elizabeth Jackson Brake.  Elizabeth Jackson Brake was the sister of Col. George Jackson. There will be more concerning the death of Wm. Brake and Porter Arnold in a future issue of the Jackson Brigade.

Children of Porter Arnold and Julia Stephenson are:

+      36               i.    Laura Ann5 Arnold, born 1849 in Taylor County, West Virginia; died 01 July 1871.

+      37              ii.    Cora E. Arnold, born May 1850.

38             iii.    Leah Prudence Arnold, born Abt. 1854.

39             iv.    George Jackson Arnold, born 1860.

 

6.  Sarah Catherine4 Arnold (Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 01 May 1824 in Fauquier County, Virginia, and died 29 June 1911 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia13.  She married Charles Van Swearington Hall 24 May 1849 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia14.  He was born 04 May 1832 in Fairmont, West Virginia, and died 07 June 1857 in Philippi, Barbour County, West Virginia.

Charles was an attorney in Philippi, Barbour County, West Virginia. After Charles’ death, Sarah lived with her brother, George J. Arnold.

 

Children of Sarah Arnold and Charles Hall are:

40               i.    Ella5 Hall, born 06 August 1850 in Philippi, Barbour County, West Virginia; died 25 July 1924 in Lewis County, West Virginia15. Ella was single and adopted two of her brother’s children, Catherine and William.

+      41              ii.    William Dexter Hall, born 09 March 1852 in Philippi, Barbour County, West Virginia; died in Kitsonville, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

7.  John George4 Arnold (Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 01 February 1826 in Fauquier County, Virginia, and died 30 October 1907 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia16.  He married (1) Artemissa Butcher, daughter of John Butcher.  She was born 1839 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 24 October 1914 in Lewis County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 24 October 1914, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia. He married (2) Lucy Ann Bailey22 May 1855, daughter of John Bailey and Catherine Bastable.  She was born 1837 in Harrison County, (West) Virginia, and died 18 January 1877 in Lewis County, West Virginia17. Lucy died about the time they moved to Weston.  She may be buried in the Jacksonville cemetery, but is not on the reading.  She is also not listed with the rest of the family in the Machpelah Cemetery.

      He lived in Jacksonville until age 50.

Children of John Arnold and Lucy Bailey are:

42               i.    Ada5 Arnold, born 05 November 1856 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 11 December 1861 in Lewis County, West Virginia18.

43              ii.    Charles B. Arnold, born 12 December 1858 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 13 March 1883 in Lewis County, West Virginia. Cause of death: suicide. Burial: Aft. 13 March 1883, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia

44             iii.    Georgianna “Jean” Arnold, born 09 September 1860 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married John Morrow.

45             iv.    Florence A. “Florena” Arnold, born December 1862 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 20 September 1886 in Upshur County, West Virginia19. Birth is from her tombstone, but calculated from death at 23y8m12d she would have been born 8 Jan 1863. Father was informant on death record. She died in Buckhannon at the residence of John S. Fisher.

 

8.  Harriet Ann4 Arnold (Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 23 October 1831 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 02 November 1911 in probably Upshur County, West Virginia.  She married John Strother Fisher 12 December 1860 in Lewis County, West Virginia20, son of Martin Fisher and Rose. He was born 01 October 1821 in Rockbridge County, Virginia, and died 09 September 1893 in Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia. John was an attorney in Buckhannon. Buried Heavner Cemetery, Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia. His tombstone reads: I believe that my redeemer liveth.

Children of Harriet Arnold and John Fisher are:

46               i.    Infant5 Fisher, born 02 June 1862 in Upshur County, West Virginia21,22; died 02 June 1862 in Upshur County, West Virginia.

+      47              ii.    Wade Hampton Fisher, born May 1864 in Upshur County, West Virginia.

+      48             iii.    Maude Strother Fisher, born 01 May 1866 in Upshur County, West Virginia; died 1951.

49             iv.    Mary Arnold Fisher, born 03 June 1867 in Upshur County, West Virginia23; died 1950. Burial: 1950, Heavner Cemetery, Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia.

50              v.    Grace Lee Fisher, born 15 December 1868 in Upshur County, West Virginia24.  She married Thomas Franklin Morgan 09 June 1897 in Upshur County, West Virginia; born 1869 in Richmond, Virginia; died 1946. Burial: 1956, Heavner Cemetery, Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia. They lived in Washington, DC. Burial: 1946, Heavner Cemetery, Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia

+      51             vi.    John Howard Fisher, born 1870 in Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia; died 16 February 1933.

 

9.  Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie” (Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born March 1833 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 21 March 1912 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia25.  She married Henry Brannon 22 December 1858 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia26.  He was born 26 November 1837 in Winchester, Virginia, and died 24 November 1914 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia27.

Her name is “Helta Jane” on tombstone. Both buried Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

Newspaper article: January 9, 1892

“Miss Brannon Receive Her Friends

The beautiful and commodious three-story brick residence of Judge Henry Brannon on Court Street was a place of especial interest and attraction New Year’s Day.  It was the occasion of a reception given by Miss Brannon to her numerous friends.  The hours for calling were from 2 till 5 pm.

The handsome parlor was magnificently decorated with evergreens, smilax and roses.  No preparation that would augment the beauty of arrangement or enhance the peculiar appropriateness of the appointments was omitted.  The decorations were lovely and reflected the rare taste of those who had them in charge.

Those who assisted Miss Brannon in receiving were Mrs. Dr. M. Edmiston, Mrs. Dr. J. I Warder, Miss Nina Harrison, Miss Lewis and Miss Lillie Brown.

Refreshments, consisting of meats, salads, fruits, cake and c., were served.

The ladies were beautifully attired in costumes as follows:

Mrs. Edmiston, black net and lace; Mrs. Warder, black silk with jet and chiffon trimmings;  Miss Brannon, yellow silk with chiffon trimmings;  Miss Brown, white silk and lace;  Miss Lewis, light blue silk and lace;  Miss Harrison, strawberry silk, lace and velvet trimmings.”

 

Henry Brannon located in Weston in 1858; graduated from U of Virginia 1859; admitted to bar 1859; Prosecuting attorney 1860-1865; House of Delegates 1870-1871; Judge of 11th Judicial District 1881-1889; Supreme Court of Appeals of WV 1889-1905; Author of “Treaties on Rights and Privileges Under the Fourteenth Amendment of the U. S. Constitution.

 

From the Society page of Weston Democrat,  October 28, 1921

BRILLIANT WEDDING

      “On Wednesday evening, October 26th, in the spacious parlors of the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Edwards on Center Avenue, Weston, West Virginia, occurred the marriage of their daughter, Virginia Olivia Edwards and Dr. Clarence Robert Moore, the ceremony taking place in the same spot where, sixty-two years ago, was performed the marriage of the bride’s maternal grandparents, the late Judge Henry Brannon and Jane Arnold Brannon

Promptly at half after seven o’clock Master George Norvell, bearing the ring upon a satin cushion, entered, followed by groom, accompanied by his best man, Dr. Charles P. Aspinall.  Following the groom came his sister, Mrs. Magnus Young, of Washington, D.C., wearing a cloth of gold gown and carrying lavender chrysanthemums, tied with gold tulle.  Then came Mrs. Lawrence B. Harris, a cousin of the bride, who wore a gown of cloth of gold and orange and carried gold chrysanthemums, tied with orange tulle.  Following Mrs. Harris came Mr. John Workmeister and Mr. Eugene Edwards, followed by Mrs. French Fox, wearing a cloth of gold and orchid gown and carrying pink chrysanthemums, tied with orchid tulle.  The matron of honor, Mrs. Louise Edwards Koblegard, sister of the bride, wore a gold and turquoise feather fan.  The little flower girl, Martha Brannon Norvell, wore a pink crepe de chine dress, trimmed with rosebuds, and scattered rose petals before the bride.

To the strain of Lohengrin’s wedding march, the bride entered upon the arm of her father, by whom she was given in marriage.  The bride’s gown was a beautiful white sequin robe over satin, with court train, and she wore a veil of tulle, caught with orange blossoms which had been worn by her mother.  Her only jewels were a strand of pearls and a diamond and platinum ring, gifts of the groom.  She carried a shower bouquet of brides roses and valley lilies.

The Episcopal service was read by Rev. John S. Alfrend from a prayer book which had belonged to the bride’s maternal grandmother.  During the ceremony Mrs. Walter A. Edwards sang “I Love You.”

After the ceremony the guest were led to the dining room where the wedding cake was cut.  The ceremony was followed by a brilliant reception, during which several hundred guests called.  The guests were invited into the dining room by Mrs. Edward A. Brannon, where delicious ices and cake were served.   Mrs. Thomas A. Edwards, Mrs. George W. Norvell, Mrs. Robert J. Ray and Miss Mary Edwards assisted in the dining room.  Miss Gertrude Edwards served cake from the table, which was beautifully decorated with orchid chrysanthemums.

In the living room coffee was poured by the bride’s grandmother, Mrs. Mary O. Edwards, the silver service used being that owned by the bride’s great-great grandmother Edwards.  Throughout the evening an orchestra rendered delightful selections.

***

Mrs. Robert Ray and Mrs. Lawrence Harris were hostesses Tuesday evening at a reception at the home of their mother, Mrs. John Warder, honoring Miss Virginia Edwards who marriage to Dr. Clarence Moore took place Wednesday evening at the bride’s home on Center avenue.

In the receiving line were the hostesses, the honor guest, Mrs. M.O. Edwards, grandmother of the bride, Mrs. George Norvell, of Huntington, Mrs. Young, of Washington, D.C., and Mrs. John Koblegard, Jr.

Mrs. John Warder, Mrs. Flannery, of Baltimore, and Miss Gertrude Edwards invited the guests to the dining room.  Ices were served by Mrs. Huffman Edwards and Mrs. Mamie Whelan, assisted by Mrs. Albert O’Hara, Mrs. Edgar Fleetwood, Mrs. Tom Edwards and Miss Eugenia Arnold.  Coffee was poured by Mrs. Edward Brannon assisted by Miss Mary Fisher and Mrs. John Harris.

The Novelty Five rendered beautiful music during the hours from eight to ten.

***

A dinner party of lovely appointments was given Monday evening by Mrs. M.O. Edwards and Miss Gertrude Edwards honoring Miss Virginia Edwards and Dr. Clarence Moore whose marriage was a brilliant social event of Wednesday evening.  Her guest list included the members of the bridal party, and out of town guests here for the wedding.

 

Children of Henrietta “Hattie” and Henry Brannon are:

+      52               i.    Ida Jackson5 Brannon, born 1860 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 09 February 1919.

+      53              ii.    Mary Hortense “Mamie” Brannon, born May 1864 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died in Huntington, West Virginia.

+      54             iii.    Alice Gertrude Brannon, born May 1866 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died April 1930 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      55             iv.    Edward Arnold Brannon, born 04 April 1870 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 1942.

+      56              v.    Ella Virginia Brannon, born December 1862 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died Aft. 1930 in probably Baltimore, Maryland.

57             vi.    Henry Jr. Brannon, born April 1874 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 14 August 1905. He was an attorney and died from a pistol shot. Burial: Aft. 14 August 1905, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia

 

Generation No. 3

 

10.  Amanda Jane5 Arnold (George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 15 March 1841 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 16 December 1881 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married John Strange Hall 15 March 1861 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  He was born 29 January 1826 in Big Skin Creek, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 30 March 1912 in Abrams Run, Lewis County, West Virginia.vBoth buried Hall Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia

 

Children of Amanda Arnold and John Hall are:

+      58               i.    Susan “Sue” Ella6 Hall, born 25 April 1862 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 30 May 1943 in Moffitt, Arkansas.

59              ii.    Isabel Maude Hall, born 08 May 1863 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 29 January 1947 in Akron, Ohio.  She marriedWilliam Wesley Johnson; born 24 June 1850; died 01 April 1937.

+      60             iii.    Lillian Gladys “Gay” Hall, born 13 February 1865 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 02 December 1917.

61             iv.    Cora E. Hall, born 26 September 1866 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 25 September 1878.

62              v.    Rev. Jackson Arnold Hall, born 08 August 1868 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 24 March 1945 in Norfolk, Virginia.  He married Ellen Corprew; died Bef. 1945. Burial: Forest Lawn Cemetery.

63             vi.    Mary Strange “Mamie” Hall, born 19 December 1870 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 29 December 1959. She died at the Mary E. Ballentine Home, Norfolk, Virginia. Burial: Aft. 29 December 1959, Forest Lawn Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      64            vii.    Wayne K. Hall, born Bet. 09 – 10 December 1872 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 12 June 1937 in Walkersville, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      65           viii.    John Earl Hall, born 29 July 1877 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      66             ix.    Worth C. Hall, born Bet. 06 – 07 November 1879 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 10 December 1955 in South Charleston, West Virginia.

 

11.  Porter M.5 Arnold (George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 25 October 1866 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 26 May 1959, at age 92,  in Lewis County, West Virginia.  He married Bennie Francis Alkire 14 February 1900 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  She was born 1878 in West Virginia, and died 20 February 1959 in probably Lewis County, West Virginia. Both Machpelah Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

 

Porter Arnold

 

“Porter Arnold, president of the Bank of Weston, at Weston, judicial center of Lewis County, was born in this attractive little city on the 25th of October 1866, and is a son of George J. and Anna (Swick) Arnold.  The former was born in Virginia, in 1817, and was reared and educated in what is now Lewis County, West Virginia, where his father became a pioneer farmer and substantial and honored citizen.  George J. Arnold received the advantages of the common schools, and his early experiences were those of the farm, his wife, who was born in this county, in 1837, having likewise been reared on a farm.  As a young man George J. Arnold studied law and gained admission to the bar.  He and his wife established their home at Weston, and here he continued in the practice of his profession until he retired and returned to his farm; where he passed the remainder of his life.  He became a representative member of the bar of Lewis County, and was a man of marked business ability also.  He was one of the largest landowners of Lewis County at the time of his death.  Both he and his wife were earnest communicants of the Protestant Episcopal Church, and he was a leader in the local councils of the democratic party.  He served one term in the State Legislature, and was also nominated for county judge, but was defeated.  Of the eight children five are living, the subject of this sketch being the oldest of the number; Genevieve is the wife of Dr. T.J.W. brown, of Washington District of Columbia; Maude, a graduate of the college of Winchester, Virginia, is the wife of E.A. Gillen; Jackson who was graduated in law, is now at the head of the state police of West Virginia; and Flora, the widow of Lee Gowell, resides at Sutton, Braxton County.

After completing his studies in the public schools Porter Arnold entered Rockhill College, near Baltimore, Maryland, and after leaving this institution he had charge of his father’s farm until the time of his marriage, February 14, 1900, to Miss Bernice Alkire, who is a graduate of Luthersville College.  After his marriage Mr. Arnold not only continued his association with farm enterprise and the buying and shipping of live stock, but also engaged in the mercantile business at Weston, where he is still identified with this line of business.  He served for a long period as a director of the National Exchange Bank, and in 1908 he became one of the organizers of the Bank of Weston, of which he has since served consecutively as the president, George W. Wilson being vice president and W.A. Edwards, the cashier, the directorate including these officers and also Charles M. Snaith, Lot Hall, Frank Mertz and Riley Gugg.  Mr. Arnold is the owner of a find landed estate of 1025 acres in Lewis County.  He is a staunch democrat and was at one time his party’s candidate for county sheriff.  He is affiliated with the local lodge of Knights of Pythias, and he and his wife are communicants of the Protestant Episcopal Church.  They have five children: Eugenia, Margaret, Elizabeth, John P. and Samuel J.  Eugenia is a graduate of the exclusive school of Stewart’s hall, Virginia, and Margaret is a graduate of the Weston High School.  The family home is a center of gracious hospital and is the stage of much of the representative social life of the community.” Source: History of West Virginia Old and New and West Virginia Biography Vol. III, by Special Staff of Writers.  Chicago and New York: The American Historical Society, Inc. p. 181.

 

Children of Porter Arnold and Bennie Alkire are:

+      67               i.    Eugenia “Jean” Porter6 Arnold, born 25 February 1901 in West Virginia; died 31 January 1991 in Hackettstown, New Jersey.

68              ii.    Margaret Arnold, born Abt. 1906 in West Virginia. Lived in New York City and Hackettown, New Jersey; single 1991.

69             iii.    Elizabeth Arnold, born Abt. 1908 in West Virginia.  She married E. G. McElroy.

70             iv.    Samuel Jackson Arnold, born Abt. 1915 in West Virginia. He was a resident of San Diego in 1991, and had one son and one daughter.

+      71              v.    John Porter Arnold, born 10 April 1910 in West Virginia; died March 1947 in Akron, Ohio.

 

15.  Maude A.5 Arnold (George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born Abt. 1874 in West Virginia.  She married Gillan.

Maude had two children, a son who died about 17 and daughter Eleanor Short who died and left 3 children.

Children of Maude Arnold and Gillan are:

72               i.    Son6 Gillan.

+      73              ii.    Eleanor Gillan.

 

16.  Jackson5 Arnold (George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 16 September 1875 in West Virginia, and died 06 June 1993 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  He married Mary Cox 18 April 1908, daughter of James Cox.  She was born 1884 in West Virginia, and died 1927 in West Virginia.

 

Military service:  Spanish American War: Inf: Enlisted May 25, 1899; discharged April 10, 1899: Company F 2nd Regt. WV Inf. Mustered in June 30, 1898 at Charleston, WV.  Absent with leave July 21 to 25th incl. At Weston, W.Va.  Absent with leave Sept 1 to 5, 1898 incl. Baltimore, Md.  Sick in Qrs. July 7 1898 to Dec 20, 1898 to 22, 1898, incl. In line of duty.  Lt. From N. G. 150th Inf. To discharge, Fairmont, W. Va.  Hattiesburg, Miss. A. E. F. Aug. 2, 1918 to Feb 24, 1919; Discharged April 7, 1919.  (taken from typed copy – HCPD)

Child of Jackson Arnold and Mary Cox is:

74               i.    Jackson Jr.6 Arnold, born Abt. 1911 in West Virginia. He was adopted, lived in New Orleans, LA.

 

17.  George F. A.5 Arnold (George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1)28 was born 02 November 1877 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 11 January 1919.  He married Bertie Rohrbough 05 May 1905, daughter of Nicholas Columbus and Sarah West.  She was born 07 August 1879 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 06 October 1958 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both buried Machpelah Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

Children of George Arnold and Bertie Rohrbough are:

+      75               i.    Raymond F.6 Arnold, born 21 September 1906 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      76              ii.    George Jackson Arnold, born 23 September 1908 in Arnold, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 06 May 1955 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      77             iii.    Eleanor Arnold, born 08 December 1910 in Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

+      78             iv.    Evelyn Arnold, born 11 August 1914 in Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

20.  Jonathan “John” Elijah5 Hall (Mary Elizabeth4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 18 February 1846 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 08 November 1914 in Atlee, Hanover County, Virginia29.  He married Florence Ann Rowland Wilson 21 October 1884 in Cabin Creek, Lewis County, West Virginia, daughter of William Rowland and Mary DeAtley.  She was born 11 June 1853 in Lewis County, Kentucky, and died 09 April 1893 in Poplar Flat, Kentucky. Both buried Ebenezer Churchyard, Poplar Flat, Kentucky.

 

Children of Jonathan Hall and Florence Wilson are:

79               i.    Charles Rowland6 Hall, born 18 September 1885 in Kentucky; died 28 November 1962 in Tioga, Pennsylvania.  He married Margaret Thornton Morrison 29 June 1916 in King Williams County, Virginia; born 22 March 1899 in King Williams County, Virginia.

80              ii.    Ann Florence Hall, born 11 June 1887; died 10 April 1965.  She married James Cambell Wingfield; born 10 December 1886; died 25 September 1970.

81             iii.    Mary Helen Hall, born 19 May 1891; died 18 December 1918.  She married George Jefferson Smith; born 08 May 1886; died 17 June 1977. Both buried Old Homestead Cemetery, Hanover, Virginia.

 

23.  George William5 Hall (Mary Elizabeth4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 02 August 1853 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 1922 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia.  He married Mary Virginia Christian 21 January 1886 in Lewis County, West Virginia, daughter of Edmund O. Christian, M. D..  She was born 29 September 1860, and died 01 March 1955. Both buried Hall Cemetery, Gordon Hall Farm, Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia

Children of George Hall and Mary Christian are:

+      82               i.    Josephine A.6 Hall, born November 1886; died December 1917.

83              ii.    Mary E. Hall, born January 1889; died 1955 in Welch, West Virginia.  She married (1) Walter Sinclair.  She married (2) B. F. Howard.

+      84             iii.    Georgie Christian Hall, born 09 August 1890 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

85             iv.    Charles Oliver Hall, born 1895 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 1897 in Lewis County, West Virginia. Burial: 1897, Hall Cemetery, Gordon Hall Farm, Lewis County, West Virginia.

86              v.    Gordon T. Hall, born June 1897 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia.  He married Nell Jones.

+      87             vi.    Virginia Hall, born September 1899 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

24.  Helen Eliza5 Hall (Mary Elizabeth4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 18 March 1857, and died August 1900.  She married George Clark 23 September 1884, son of G. Clark and M..

In the 1920 census Mable Clark was no longer living with Helen and George. In 1920 no census listing for Clark,

Children of Helen Hall and George Clark are:

88               i.    Floride6 Clark, born November 1888 in Kansas.

89              ii.    Mable Clark, born March 1893 in Kansas.

90             iii.    Gerald Clark, born February 1895 in Kansas.

 

26.  Mary5 Arnold (William Edward4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 08 March 1849 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 23 August 1925 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married Dr. Thomas Bland Edmiston 11 April 1871, son of Matthew Edmiston and Minerva Bland. He was born 01 December 1844 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 13 September 1875 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia30. Both buried Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.

She died of pneumonia.

Obit: Mrs.  Mary Edmiston, died on Sunday.  Widow of Dr. Thomas B. Edmiston. She was age 76 years, and was a daughter of late William E. Arnold.  Leaves daughter, Grace Edmiston and one brother, Wilson A. Arnold of Jackson’s Mill.  Funeral today and interment at Machpelah cemetery.(Weston Independent, Wednesday, 26 August, 1925)

 

Obit: Sept. 20, 1875

Death of Dr. Edmiston

The sad emblems of mortality are crowding upon us.  Last week we announced the sudden taking off of a distinguished citizen of Upshur county; and now we are called upon to write of the untimely death of one of the most brilliant and able young men that our State has ever produced.  Our pencil lingers sadly as we write; as with sincere and lasting grief we pen the words that announce the death of Thomas B. Edmiston.

Of all the young men of our acquaintance, he was the brightest and most scholarly.  In his profession he stood at the top of the ladder.  As a man and citizen he was the soul of honor.  In his death our community has lost one of its most useful members; the science of medicine a rare and apt student; his relatives one who was dear to them as the apple of their eye; and the State a citizen whose ability as a physician we were not able to spare.

Dr. Edmiston was born in Weston, in December 1845 and was consequently in his 30th year.  He was the eldest son of Judge Matthew and Mrs. Minerva Edmiston.  In early life he received all the advantages of education and being of a quick and retentive mind, he rapidly became a leader in the exercises of his class. For some time he was undecided as to which of the two professions –law or medicine–he would adopt, but finally concluded to study medicine.  In March, 1868, he graduated with distinguished honors at Bellevue Medical College, New York; and upon his return home entered actively into the practice of his profession.  His ability as a physician soon became known; and although a young man, he was sought after in nearly all cases requiring consummate skill, good judgment and a thorough knowledge of his profession.

On the 11th of April, 1871, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Arnold, eldest daughter of Hon. William E. Arnold, of this place.

His death occurred at 7 1/2 o’clock pm on Monday, September 13, after an illness of not more than 48 hours.

In addition to his sorrowing father, mother, brothers and sisters, he leaves his heart-broken wife and two sweet little children.

His remains were interred on the 25th inst. in the cemetery near town.

Our community cannot realize as yet, that Dr. Edmiston is dead.  So young, fresh and vigorous; just, as it were, stepping upon the threshold of a long life of usefulness and profit, it seems too dreadful to contemplate the sad fact, that he has gone from us, to meet no more, this side of the River of Death!  But a few days ago he was with us, in the full possession of life and strength –now his body has been consigned to the dust, and his soul returned to the God who gave it!

To the relatives and many friends of the deceased, the heartfelt sympathy of our community is extended.

Children of Mary Arnold and Thomas Edmiston are:

91               i.    Grace6 Edmiston, born 03 March 1872 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 28 October 1958 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. She died in Weston State Hospital, single.

92              ii.    Matthew Arnold Edmiston, born 29 August 1873 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia; died 24 April 1912 in Emergency Hospital, Washington, DC31. Burial: Aft. 24 April 1912, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia

Obit: Edmiston, Arnold, died at the Emergency Hospital in Washington, D. C. , Wednesday.  Born in Weston about 39 years ago, son of late Dr. Thomas Edmiston, grandson of late Judge Matthew Edmiston.  His mother, Mrs. Mary Edmiston is the daughter of late William E. Arnold. He was unmarried. Body was brought to Weston and funeral services held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on Friday. Interment at Machpelah cemetery. (Weston Democrat, Friday, 26 April 1912.)

 

29.  Floride “Flodie”5 Arnold (William Edward4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 02 July 1855 in Lewis County, West Virginia32, and died 23 June 1919.  She married John Harper McClellen 15 April 1885 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  He was born 09 December 1847 in Greene County, Pennsylvania, and died 06 August 1887. Burial: Aft. 06 August 1887, Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia

John was a civil engineer with the B & O Railroad and lived in Cincinnati.

 

“Weston Democrat,” October 6, 1900

Floride McClellan and daughter leave today for Martinsburg where they will spend the winter.  Next summer they will occupy their new cottage just completed on the farm at Jacksonville — a handsome little residence located on an eminence overlooking a wide expanse of beautiful bottom land for which the surrounding country is noted.

 

Newspaper article:

“McClellan – Arnold:  A brilliant assemblage of relatives and invited guests assembled on Wednesday morning at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Arnold to witness the marriage of their youngest daughter, Miss Floride, to Mr. John Harper McClellan of Louisville, Kentucky.  At 11:00 o’clock a.m., the ceremony was performed in an impressive and solemn manner by Rev. J. W. Keeble of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Mr. B. W. Jackson, Miss Sallie McCandlish of Parkersburg, and Miss Susie Bansemer of Baltimore acted as attendants.

The groom is well and favorably known here and is respected for his many fine qualities.  The bride was a bright ornament to Weston society.  She takes with her to her Kentucky home the love and esteem of all.  A reception consisting of every luxury in edibles was enjoyed.  Mr. and Mrs. McClellan, after receiving the congratulations of those present, took the 12:30 train for Louisville, where they will make their future home.  The presents were varied and costly, showing the great esteem in which the parties were held.  Taken altogether, it was an elegant and sensible, yet unostentatious wedding.  We wish “Mac” and his bride a long, happy and prosperous voyage over the sea of life.”  (unknown source)

 

Child of Floride Arnold and John McClellen is:

+      93               i.    Mary Prudence6 McClellen, born 08 March 1886 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio; died 14 July 1973 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

35.  Wilson A.5 Arnold (William Edward4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 19 December 1862 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 27 November 1933 in Jackson’s Mill, Lewis County, West Virginia33.  He died at age 71y11m8d. Burial: Aft. 27 November 1933, Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. He married (1) Mrs. Rhoda Lee Garrett.    He married (2) Gertrude Patricia Davisson 27 October 1886 in Lewis County, West Virginia, daughter of George Davisson and Elizabeth.  She was born Abt. 1870 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 10 October 1894 in Lewis County, West Virginia34. She is probably buried on Arnold Hill.

 

Marriage for Wilson Arnold and Gertrude Davisson:

Oct. 30, 1886, “Weston Democrat.”

 

BRILLIANT WEDDING AT CAPT. GEO. I. DAVISSON’S

      “On Wednesday evening, October 27th there occurred one of the happiest events in the matrimonial field it has been the good fortune of your correspondent to witness for many long years.  The parties to this brilliant affair were Miss Gertrude D. Davisson, daughter of our candidate for the House of Delegates, and Mr. Wilson A. Arnold, son of your townsman Hon. Wm. E. Arnold.  The ceremony was performed at the beautiful country residence of Captain Davisson, about one mile from Jacksonville, by the Rev. Wamsley, of the last named place.  No invitations were issued but the relatives of both parties felt it to be their privilege and their pleasure to attend as did also the friends in the neighborhood.  In consequence thereof quite a number of guests were present.  About 8 pm the family and guests assembled in the large and brilliantly lighted parlor and expectantly awaited the appearance of the bride and groom, who in a few minutes entered, and immediately the ceremony took place.  The hearty congratulations and numerous wishes for happy future followed, and the entire party, led by those upon whom the sacred and holy title of man and wife had just been bestowed, adjourned to the dining room, where an elegant and sumptuous repast, such as would have delighted the gaze of the most pronounced epicure was placed.

After this, dancing was indulged in until the wee small hours, when all adjourned with the complete and firm convictions that long will be the time when the neighborhood will witness a like event of such magnificence and importance.  All will remember the beautiful appearance of the bride, who wore a magnificent and costly dress of white silk, and also that of the groom, who looked very handsome in his elegant and neat fitting suit of black.  In conclusion, your correspondent desires to express the wish – and he knows it is echoed in the hearts of all who were present –that the expression of extreme happiness upon the faces of the fortunate couple may never be marred or changed by contacts with the disappointment of life, but that the bonds of Wednesday evening may be cemented and made firmer and the dark clouds of adversity and trouble may be always dispelled by the sunshine of love.                                                   B. T. W.

Jacksonville, Oct. 28”

 

Children of Wilson Arnold and Gertrude Davisson are:

94               i.    Female6 Arnold, died 1887 in Lewis County, West Virginia35.

95              ii.    Susan Wilson Arnold, died 28 December 1892 in Gee Lick, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia36. She died at age 4m19d.

96             iii.    William E. Arnold, died December 1891 in Lewis County, West Virginia37.

Obit: Infant son of Wilson Arnold died Tuesday from the effect of a dose of carbolic acid given by mistake for cough medicine. He was interred by the side of his distinguished grandfather in the Hill cemetery on Tuesday.

 

36.  Laura Ann5 Arnold (Porter Mandeville4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 1849 in Taylor County, West Virginia, and died 01 July 1871.  She married John B. Watson 12 March 1867.  He was born 1845 in Sand Fork, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 26 October 1928 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 26 October 1928, Watson Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

Children of Laura Arnold and John Watson are:

97               i.    Porter6 Watson, born 1868 in West Virginia.

98              ii.    Charlie Watson, born 1870 in West Virginia.

 

37.    Cora E.5 Arnold (Porter Mandeville4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born May 1850.  She married William Martin.

38.    

Children of Cora Arnold and William Martin are:

99               i.    Thomas6 Martin.

100            ii.    Gertrude Martin.

101           iii.    Floride Martin.

102           iv.    Leah Prudence Martin.  She married Bennett.

 

41.  William Dexter5 Hall (Sarah Catherine4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 09 March 1852 in Philippi, Barbour County, West Virginia, and died in Kitsonville, Lewis County, West Virginia38. Burial: Aft. 31 August 1900, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.  He married Ida Black.

Children of William Hall and Ida Black are:

103             i.    William Edward6 Hall, born May 1895 in Lewis County, West Virginia. William was adopted by his Aunt Ella.

104            ii.    Catherine Hall, born 02 September 1900 in Lewis County, West Virginia. She was born on the day her father was buried. Catherine was adopted by her Aunt Ella.

105           iii.    Ernest Hall, born 17 October 1896 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 27 October 1913 in Lewis County, West Virginia. He was a scout leader and died at age 17. Burial: Aft. 27 October 1913, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia

106           iv.    Mabel Hall, born July 1899 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

47.  Wade Hampton5 Fisher (Harriet Ann4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born May 1864 in Upshur County, West Virginia.  He marriedElla Newlon 24 December 1889, daughter of G. Newlon and A. E. She was born 1866 in West Virginia, and died 10 April 1941 in West Virginia.

Wade was an attorney in Buckhannon, West Virginia, admitted to the bar in 1888.

Child of Wade Fisher and Ella Newlon is:

107             i.    Margauerite N.6 Fisher, born 1891 in Upshur County, West Virginia.

 

48.  Maude Strother5 Fisher (Harriet Ann4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 01 May 1866 in Upshur County, West Virginia39, and died 1951.  Burial: 1951, Heavner Cemetery, Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia. She married Charles Ogilvie Latham 12 August 1890, son of G. Latham and Caroline A.  He was born 1858 in Taylor County, West Virginia, and died 1942. Charles was a lumberman.

Children of Maude Fisher and Charles Latham are:

108             i.    Gertrude6 Latham, born 26 October 1891 in Upshur County, West Virginia40.

 

MISS GERTRUDE LATHAM ENLISTS HER SERVICES

Found in a private collection- a series of newspaper articles probably taken from an Upshur County, WV newspaper during WWI

 

Editor’s Note:  Gertrude Latham was a great-great granddaughter of George Jackson and Elizabeth Brake, from the Elijah and Prudence Jackson Arnold line.   Her parents were Charles Ogilvie and Maude Strother Fisher Latham.

 

“1918 – Miss Gertrude Latham, a well-known local girl has offered her services and been accepted by our government to do Canteen Service for our soldier boys.  Miss Latham is a volunteer and will give her best and every effort to bring comfort and cheer to the boys “over there.”  An opportunity is offered Buckhannon people among whom Miss Latham was born and reared to show their appreciation of her unselfish patriotic spirit in the great plan of war work.  There is no recompense given the canteen girls for their services, on the other hand, any girl entering the service for this work must necessarily have financial backing to meet the expense she will incur, without salary, but with zeal, courage, and a desire to do her bit Miss Latham is in readiness to go from her home, over there where it is the privilege of the Canteen girls to lend a touch of home comfort to men who are away from their homelands.  In helping send Miss Latham into the service you are helping the Red Cross and making possible the wonderful plan of our government to wage a successful warfare and win the victory, which means liberty to the world.”

 

LETTER FROM GERTRUDE LATHAM

Paris, October 13, 1918

 

“Dearest Folks:

Isn’t this some hotel?  Its considered the best in Paris, and ______we sent here.  Rates special for the Red Cross were given _____the day, $.4.20, we are getting 20f. ($4), so yesterday I tried to find another place, but it was simply impossible; everything is packed so we decided to pay the extra twenty cents a day ourselves and stay where we are, for some of the ____are having such an awful time, and we are really having ____. We will be here only _-days or two weeks, so I guess we can stand it, as when _get outside of Paris we won’t have to pay much.

The eats are simply marvelous but I’m not very strong for the continental breakfast, which consists of bread–not so bad, chocolate and jam; the appetites we have are something fearful, and make up at the other two meals.  It takes one to two hours to get through a meal, usually 2.  Oh, we’ll get used to it in time.  Our breakfasts are served in our rooms, but the luncheon and dinners in a special dinning room for the Red Cross. There are 28 in our party.

Will you be surprised to know that I’ve been here two nights and to two dances?  At Headquarters they told us about them and asked us to go. The first was at a hospital about a mile from here, and they took us out in the Army Carrion (big truck) there were about 40 girls, and we certainly had a time.  This one was for the privates in the Medical Corps and some of the patients.  Next Friday is to be for the Officers.  The men were just as glad to see the khaki uniforms.  The other dance was in the city for the A.M. soldiers and Red Cross girls.  No one can enter without uniforms. Our uniforms pass us in most anywhere we want to go, and everyone is so grand to the A.M. girls.

I am going to remain in France instead of going to England.  I am so glad my boss is Mrs. W. K. Vanderbilt.  We (Miss Rhoda Frame of Pittsburg and I) have been very lucky in being assigned to her.  Don’t know when nor where we will be sent from here, but this is the 400 Department, so Lt. Rano told us.  Send my mail addressed to me in care of the American Red Cross, Paris, France, and you will only need a 3cent stamp, otherwise it will take 5 cents.  I haven’t gotten any mail and don’t expect to for an age, as there had been such an uncertainty about my locations, but I’ll know its on the way and be thankful whenever anything comes.

There is a Mrs. Tuttle, writer for the Saturday Evening Post traveling with us, so watch for any articles by her, they will be under the name of Marie Tulle.  She is very nice, and through her we hope to go places we could not otherwise.

I mailed you cards and letters in Bordeaux, and hope they got there O.K.  We had the most wonderful trip up the ___-River.  It was just at sunset, and I never saw anything so beautiful.  I haven’t time to describe it now, as I must go with Edith Long to Notre Dame.  We have so much to do that we have not gotten anywhere yet.

Much love to all.  I am well, and getting along splendidly.   Only wish you all could be here too.

Am anxious to get to work as they need us so badly and seem so glad we are here.

Fondly

Gertrude Latham

American Red Cross, Paris

France”

 

 

GERTRUDE LATHAM WRITES

December 2, 1918

 

“Dear Grandma:

Today I am on the coffee stand to have a few minutes when I am not busy, hence this note to you.

The coffee stand is a small canteen where the coffee is made in large quantities for the canteen proper, and troops passing through.  There are three big warmets, each holding about 30 gallons, and these are kept going all the time.  This is made double strength, so when we mix it half a small warmet is filled, and this filled with hot water, it is then sweetened and condensed milk put in, and then ready to serve.

When the girl has the coffee stand she serves troops, keeps the pantry stocked with beans, sausage, salmon, baking powders, sugar, flour, fruit, (evaporated apples, apricots, and prunes), oats, and soup; then she has the wards make sandwiches, keep the trays stacked, prepares the milk and bosses the supplies in general; so you see there isn’t much time for loafing.  I like it so much, and it really is easier than working in the big Canteen; kind of a novelty too, and the change makes it more interesting.

We have increased our menu and now we have quite a lot of things – not all at the same time but off and on, so they don’t get tired of it.  We have ham, jam, cheese or sardines, sandwiches, coffee or chocolates, macaroni and cheese, baked beans, sausage or soup, apple, apricot or chocolate puddings.  Today I made a new sauce for the pudding; we usually have flavored milk; but I made a  syrup and they like it fine.  We make things in such quantities here, this took 5 gallons of water, and 15 quarts of sugar, and 4 of vanilla.

I wrote Marie about our Thanksgiving.  We are planning for Xmas.  Have ordered forty turkeys, and will have mince pies; are gong to have a tree too, so each one will try to keep the rest from getting homesick.

Its time to go home, so I must stop; have been awfully busy today.  Much love to each one, wish I could drop in, but I wish more that you were here with me for it is so grand to be here.  Every day we see lots of French soldiers coming home and many U.S. boys going back to the States.

Merry Christmas and lot of happiness

Fondly

Gertrude.”

 

 

Ladies Night at Rotary

newspaper article: Oct. 2, 1919

 

“Tuesday evening was again set apart as Ladies’ night at the Rotary, and after a course-dinner had been served by the Ladies of the A. M. E. church, a delightful sociable hour was spent in which the orchestra played no small part, and patriotic songs was a “between course feature.”

The snowy tables were adorned with dainty vases of dahlias and other flowers of the autumn-tide, and a large American flag upon the wall lent a patriotic touch.

The feature of the after dinner program was a talk by Miss Gertrude Latham, who enjoys the distinction of being the one Buckhannon girl, who went overseas under the auspices of the Red Cross.

She spoke interestingly of her canteen work behind the battle lines of France and left the floor amidst hearty applause.

President Richard Aspinall was master of ceremonies and it is needless to day that his wit and humor enhanced the pleasure of the evening.”

 

}July 1919

Miss Gertrude Latham was to sail from the homeland,

from Marsailes on the Britania on the 17th instant.

 

The undersigned hereby makes application to forward to

Miss Gertrude Latham

American Red Cross

Paris, France

Christmas Package.  The undersigned hereby represents and declares that he or she is the nearest living relative in the United States of the proposed recipient, and that the applicant in the calendar year 1918, has not made or will not make or will not make any other Christmas shipment to the above named consignee.

Signed Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Latham

Address Buckhannon

Grace D. Arnold, Inspector”

 

“WRITE FROM OVERSEAS

Somewhere in France,

April 8, 1919

 

Dearest Folks:

Today was my day off, and I went to Poiteer, a town about forty miles from here, where I had been invited to spend it.  Had such a nice time; I saw so many interesting things.  Every where you go here is so full of new interest, and it seems one never knows just what is coming next.  We were in the room where Joan of Arc was crowned, took a picture of it which I hope will be good.  Joan surely must have traveled some in this country for every town you go into you find some place where she has been.

Every thing is getting so lovely here now; purple hyacinths growing all along the railroad track; field after field of yellow flowers.  How I wish you might see it!  Whenever I go anywhere I say, “Oh, how I wish the folks at home were here.”

Was so glad to get the Tournament paper, but so sorry our boys lost.

Virgil Bird was here Tuesday.  He had such a nice Sergeant with him, and we spent a very, very pleasant afternoon.  Took some pictures, which are at the photographers now; will send you some when I get them.  He looks so well, and we surely did talk over old times.

Your letter of March 15 came the day before one written February 16, so you see how the mails are.  Had an Easter card from “Pete” today, so there must be mails from the States.  Have had none for about ten days, but a lot will come at once.

We will get our new uniforms in a few weeks.  They say we won’t be wearing them so terribly much longer.  How does that sound?

Am sending a description written by St. Patrick of Verdun. It is one of the best I ever read.  If you want to you can have it published.  He is stationed at Verdun now.

I must go to bed, as I will have a lot to do tomorrow having been off today.

Much love to each one.  Goodnight.  Fondly,”

Newspaper Article 1919

“Virgil Bird on Tour; Meets Buckhannon Girl

 

Note:  The lady referred to in Virgil Bird’s letter as “Gertrude” is Gertrude Latham, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C.O. Latham of this city  — Editor.

 

Chemery, France, April 14

 

Dear Mother;  It has been about 15 days since I last wrote to you, and no doubt you are wondering what has happened to me.  So I am going to tell you why I have not written during the last two weeks.  I believe I told you that I was going to St. Malo the first of April, and I went.  I have some post cards that I am enclosing in this letter that will show you something of the place.  It is on the English Channel coast, and is a summer resort, something similar to Atlantic City.

Sergeant Spriggs and I went together.  We left here on the morning of the first and arrived at Tours about noon.  I started out to find Gertrude and I had quite a time finding her, too, for —at the Red Cross at Tours.  I found that she worked in St. Pierre-des-Corps, about 2 miles from the Red Cross at Tours.  A girl called the other station on the phone and we found that she was not working this day, so we got her home address in Tours and found her there.  I think it was almost 2 o’clock when we found her and I got to spend the whole afternoon with her, as our train did not leave until 6 o’clock.  She, a first lieutenant, Sergeant Spriggs and myself went out and took pictures and had a very good time together.  We also went up in the tower of the Tours cathedral, which was 310 steps and you may be sure that we were quite tired when we reached the top; and we were also quite high above the Loire river and the city.  Then as we returned we stopped an hour at St. Pierre-des-Corps and ate dinner in Gertrude’s place and had a little talk with her.  She is the ——-of the Red Cross here and there are about 12 or 15 other girls who work here.  She looks better than I ever knew her to look.  She is almost fat.  She is the most attractive girl I have ever seen in a Red Cross uniform, too.  She will send me some of the pictures we took and I’ll send them to you as soon as they come.  I enjoyed my visits with her more than any other event of my trip.  I think that she was just about as glad to see me as I was to see her and I think that Sergeant Spriggs almost fell in love with her.  At any rate he was very anxious to come via Tours on our return.

Well, we continued our journey at 6 o’clock and after a short —-in Le Mans and Rennes we finally reached our destination at —-o’clock on the morning ——We were taken to (several sentences are missing)..found St. Malo to be quite a town and quite interesting.  Our hotel was right on the beach on the opposite side of the street, and at night the tide came in and the waves came almost to the hotel.  We also had very good things to eat.

I also visited Mont St. Michel, in Normandy.  It is the seventh wonder of the world, and is the most wonderful thing I have ever seen.  The first part of it was built in the year 708, and then they kept building higher and higher until now the population is 12, 000.  The tide comes in all around it and when we reached the top of the cathedral we were about as high in the air as I have ever been.  We were told all about everything and it was very interesting.  Mont St. Michel has been fought over and has been owned by several different nations.  I’ll have to wait until I see you to tell you about it, for I can never tell you in a letter.

Although our pass was only good for seven days we were not sent from St. Malo until the 10th and this gave us 9 days there.  We got to Rennes and here the railroad transportation officer told us to wait until we were called for.  He said that they would call for us at the Red Cross when the train for Tours arrived.  Well, we didn’t wait; but instead we went to the train shed and started to board the Paris express.  We were caught here by a M. P. who told us to do as we were told; so we returned to the Red Cross.  But we tried again to get on the express and again we were caught by an M. P. who told us that if we were caught in the train shed again before they called for us that we would spend the night there in jail. Se we didn’t try to board the Paris express again.  We took the train we were told to take, but when we reached LeMans we had no difficulty in getting on the Paris train, and we got in Paris at 7 o’clock on the morning of the 11th.  We were give 24 hours to make train connections.  This time is given to every soldier who reaches Paris, and it is simply done to give them an opportunity to see Paris.  Well, I saw all of it that I could, although I was quite tired there.  We were met at the station by a Red Cross automobile.  They meet the trains with automobiles for the American soldiers who are coming into Paris.  This Red Cross was directly in front to the Eiffel Tower, and as I always had some desire to see this tower you may be sure that I took a good look at it.  It is immense.  This, however, is not in the main part of Paris, so we only stayed here long enough to get away.  We had quite a good time, as we stayed about two hours longer than our -called for I have (some sentences missing)  …ones who appreciate what America has done for France, and they certainly show it there.  They simply look after the Americans, and at times when I was having trouble to explain just what I wanted or what I was looking for, some one would step up and ask, “Can I do anything for you?”  Some of them were Americans who live in Paris and some were French who could speak English.  But Paris is quite different from our cities, and this is something else I cannot tell you about until I can talk with you.

All in all, we had a very good trip, although it was quite a trip for the amount of money I had.  On the back of the cards I’ll try and give you some information of what they are.

It is dinner time, so I will finish after I have eaten.

I am also enclosing a picture which I found in the Paris edition of the Chicago Tribune.  No doubt you have seen it in the magazines and papers, but if you have not it will interest you.

When I returned there were six or seven letters here for me;  one from Aunt Nona, one from Willard, and the others from you.  I am not going to try to answer them now.

I will say, though that you must not think that the soldiers over here can go home at any time they get ready.  When the lieutenant asked me if I wished to be classified, he was simply wishing to know if I would like to try being classified.  The disability board might not classify me at all. And every one wants to go home with the company or the organization he belongs to.  It looks as though this unit will start home pretty soon, and if it does not I believe that we will get to go to Paris to drive touring cars, and in this event we will not mind so much.  Of course, we want to go home, but we will go home before so very long, and it wouldn’t be so bad if we spent half a year in Paris.  Gertrude told me that she does not want to go home until she gets two service strips, and she is enjoying herself as she never did before.

 

With much love, Your Son,

Virgil F. Bird.”

 

“Frank – A Young Volunteer

written to Sergeant Frank B. Bartlett

by Lois Latham

Nov. 19, 1918

 

At first it was not hard, I know

To answer to your country’s call

And glad you were, and proud to give–

Your youth, your strength, your life, your all.

You were so young, so very young–

Your boys eyes could not see so far

Beyond the flag, rose red and brave

And lit by Freedom’s high white star,

You held your head up and you smiled,

Oh, gallant boy! Oh eager child!

 

You were proud of the envy of your mates,

Your mother’s tears were foolish–weak,

And there was life, and service big

Waiting if you could but seek,

And so you ventured forth alone

With boyish pride and gallantry.

The glory and the dream were there,

What lay beyond you could not see;

But by and by came longings wild,

Oh, homesick boy! Oh lonely child!

 

The work was hard, the orders strict,

(Your mates at home were playing ball,)

You were the youngest soldier there

You fretted ‘neath your country’s call.

You longed for mother’s tender eyes

(Some how SHE always understood)

Memories  made her want to cry.

And savagely you wished you could,

And yet you swaggered — yet you smiled

Oh smiling boy! Oh sobbing child!

 

Your  mother’s eyes grew wistful — big

You learned to smoke a cigarette

You marched and drilled and fought with men

And still you felt a faint regret.

If only you had waited some

Had waited –studied, been content

And yet — I’m glad and sad

And proud of you because you went

And prouder yet because you smiled

Oh boy of mine! Oh soldier child!

 

“It was so hard at first to know–

To realize you’d gone away–

Had gone where we might not follow–

Had marched thru hell to endless day.

Oh, break, my heart! — when other boys

Come marching proudly home again–

And you not there! but then I know

You’d have me bravely bear my pain,

So I will bear for –brave child!

-And you can smile, and say “’she smiled’”

GERTRUDE LATHAM ON TOUR

 

Channonix, France

June 17, 1919

“Dearest Folk:

For a week I have been dropping your cards every day from spots in France, Italy, and Switzerland, and now we are at this lovely little village right at the foot of Mt. Blanc.

Yesterday we went into Switzerland, we went on a little electric train up, up, up the mountains and through tunnels galore, until we came out right in the snow; then we went down a lovely road, where the mountains were on both sides all covered with snow; while along the foot where we were bloomed the most beautiful for-get-me-nots, buttercups, daisies, wild roses, and dozens of other flowers.

Mt. Blanc is perfectly wonderful!  We were crazy to go up, but out time being limited we could not.  The houses are all so queer, Swiss chalets built right on the steep mountains, some look like they would roll down any moment.

We are going across the glaciers this morning, the “Mer de Glasse,” start at ten o’clock equipped with a guide, Alpine stock and everything; will return about four this afternoon.    We have had a wonderful trip all along.  The ride from Nice to Monto Carlo and across into Italy was something I shall never forget.  For miles we went along just above the sea, and all the pictures do not do it half justice — it is truly a turquoise blue, with spots of emerald here and there, while the tiny sail boats away out, and the white houses with their scarlet tile roofs on the mountain side make the picture complete.

Monto Carlo is like a dream place too, and we went all through the Casina, but could not get in after they began playing, although the guide let us watch from the doors.  It is surely fascinating, but no one in uniform can enter, consequently we did not get to win a fortune.

The way back was over the old Cornish road and we went clear to the top of the mountains through olive groves and around turns that made the Horseshoe bend on the trail in North Carolina look straight.

We leave here Friday (20th) from Paris, and back to Tours on Monday.  Don’t know how much longer we shall be there but hope not a great while.

Its time to start to climb the glacier

Much love to each one.

Gertrude Latham”

 

“Engagement Announced

August 1919

 

Mrs. Charles O. Latham entertained the P. E. O. girls and a few other friends at an afternoon tea at her home on West Main on Wednesday, August 20; and the feature of the enjoyable occasion was the announcement of the engagement to her daughter Miss Gertrude Latham, who has just returned from overseas, where she went under the banner of the Red Cross.

Numerous engagements have been announced in this circle from time to time, but no one suspected that history was to repeat itself until after tea, when little Misses Anne Lorentz and Mary Lee Fisher passed to each guest an envelope marked “Souvenir from France”, which disclosed the happy secret; for within was a card bearing the picture of Miss Latham in her Red Cross uniform, and that of Richard Vaughn Lewis, Jr., in the khaki, with a ring in the center, and their names; and at this moment Master John Strother Fisher entered carrying a handsome corsage of roses with a ring tied to it, which he presented to Miss Latham, who was then showered with congratulations;

The date for the wedding has not yet been set, but it will not likely be before the holidays, as the parents still have a strong claim on their only child, who has been away so long.

Miss Latham is one of this city’s most intelligent and highly respected young ladies.  She was graduated from the Buckhannon high school, and from Wesleyan college, and was engaged in teaching when she answered the call of her country.

Her fianc¬ée, who was captain in the 77th division, is of Irving on-Hudson, and with his father, is a member of the firm of Lewis & Conger, Household Furnishings,” of New York City.  He was graduated from Williams College, Massachusetts, and was in overseas service for eighteen months, and behind the battle line at Tours, this little romance had its origin.

This paper joins in best wishes for a long and happy life as a equal.”

 

“Surprises Friends:  Soon to Wed

Aug. 1919

 

On Wednesday the twentieth, at a prettily appointed afternoon tea, Mrs. Chas. O. Latham announced the engagement of her daughter, Miss Gertrude, to Captain Richard Vaughan Lewis, Jr. of Irvington, on the Hudson, N.Y.  The guest list included the members of the P. E. O. Club and the relatives of the family.  Attractive and unique announcement cards whereon miniature kodak cuts of Miss Latham and Captain Lewis were mounted and the engagement ring designed in gold, were presented to each as a “souvenir of France.”  Miss Latham, who has but recently returned from active service as a Canteen girl with the American Red Cross and Captain Lewis, who was in charge of the 77th Division of the A. E. F., first met each other “over there,” both in the service of their country and while war was being raged, Dan Cupid was busy laying plans for days of peace.  Captain Lewis has reentered civilian life and is actively engaged in business, being a member of the firm of Lewis and Congar, of New York City.”

 

“A Fruit Shower

Nov., 6, 1919

 

Mrs. W. T. Latham recently gave a fruit shower for Miss Gertrude Latham, who is to become a bride on December 3, and the affair was a very pretty one in all its appointments.

The home was beautified with a profusion of cut flowers, and the pleasure was greatly enhanced by a brief program in which the Misses Bellis played.  Mrs. P. H. Lorentz sang and Miss Lois Latham, recited.

Supper was served, and each guest presented the fruit with an original poem, which afforded much amusement.”

 

109            ii.    Twin Latham, born 26 October 1891 in Upshur County, West Virginia.

 

51.  John Howard5 Fisher (Harriet Ann4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 1870 in Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia41, and died 16 February 1933.  He married (1) Bertha L. Bond 23 May 1900 in Upshur County, West Virginia, daughter of A. Bond and Barbara E..  She was born 1883 in West Virginia.  He married (2) Linnie F. Reger 190542, daughter of J. Reger and Mary J..  She was born 01 March 1889, and died 05 June 1917.

In 1900 he was a jeweler living with his father-in-law, Lester Bond.  His wife, Bertha was age 16, born in West Virginia. In 1905 he married Linnie F. Fisher. It is unknown if Bertha died or they were divorced.

Children of John Fisher and Linnie Reger are:

110             i.    John Strother6 Fisher, born 03 April 1907 in Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia.

111            ii.    Mary Lee Fisher, born 1909 in Buckhannon, Upshur County, West Virginia.

 

52.  Ida Jackson5 Brannon (Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie”, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 1860 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 1949. Burial: 1949, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia. She married John Irvin Warder 1882.  He was born 10 August 1856, and died 09 February 1919. He died of heart disease at age 62y6m8d. Burial: Aft. 09 February 1919, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

Children of Ida Brannon and John Warder are:

112             i.    John Irvin Jr.6 Warder, born 04 February 1883; died 12 July 1910.

He died at age 27y5m8d; his birthdate is calculated. Burial: Aft. 12 July 1910, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.

113            ii.    Henry B. Warder, born 1884; died 11 September 1912.  He married Blanche Oliver January 1912.

+      114           iii.    Ida Jane Warder, born September 1890; died 1976.

 

53.  Mary Hortense “Mamie”5 Brannon (Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie”, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born May 1864 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died in Huntington, West Virginia. Burial: Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia. She married James Joseph Whelan Bef. June 1880.  He was born 1866, and died 05 May 1886 in Thomasville, Georgia43. He died of consumption. Burial: Aft. 05 May 1886, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia

Child of Mary Brannon and James Whelan is:

+      115             i.    Mary6 Whelan, born June 1880.

 

54.  Alice Gertrude5 Brannon (Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie”, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born May 1866 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died April 1930 in Lewis County, West Virginia44.  Burial: April 1930, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia. She married James Hoffman Edwards Bef. September 1897.  He was born March 1867, and died 1937.

 

Children of Alice Brannon and James Edwards are:

116             i.    Virginia Olivia6 Edwards, born September 1897.  She married Dr. Clarence Robert Moore. There is a Clarence R. Moore b. 1888; died 1923; buried near the Brannons at Machpelah.

117            ii.    Gertrude Louise Edwards, born September 1899.  She married Jacob Koblegard.

 

55.  Edward Arnold5 Brannon (Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie”, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 04 April 1870 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 1942.  Burial: 1942, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia. He married Irma K Cowey Abt. 1910.

 

Weston Democrat, July 22, 1921

 

Edward A. Brannon Honored on State Commission

The appointment of ten lawyers to the commission to ratify the laws of the state was announced last Saturday by the state supreme court.  The appointment is in accordance with an act passed by the legislature at its last session.  The lawyers named are:

Uriah Barnes, Charleston; Edward A. Brannon, Weston; Michael J. Cullinan, Wheeling; Arthur S. Dayton, Philippi; Malcom Jackson, Charleston; Eskrige H. Morton, Webster Springs; Benjamin H. Oxley, Charleston; James A. Strother, Welch; Z. Taylor Vinson, Huntington.

The friends of Mr. Brannon will read with pleasure of his appointment.  He is thoroughly conversant on all matters pertaining to the laws of West Virginia, having received most excellent tutorage under his distinguished father, Judge Henry Brannon.  From the foregoing list one finds the names of some of the ablest lawyers in the entire state and it is gratifying tous and an honor to the county to have a representative from this city on the commission.

Children of Edward Brannon and Irma Cowey are:

118             i.    Henrietta6 Brannon, born 08 July 1910.

119            ii.    Alice Jane Brannon, born 03 August 1913.

120           iii.    Edward Arnold Brannon, born 18 October 1915.

121           iv.    Robert Brannon. This child is in question?

 

56.  Ella Virginia5 Brannon (Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie”, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born December 1862 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died Aft. 1930 in probably Baltimore, Maryland.  She married Dr. Frank J. Flannery Abt. 1883.  He was born May 1858 in Maryland, and died Aft. 1930 in probably Baltimore, Maryland. He was a physician in Baltimore Maryland.

1890 Baltimore Maryland directory: Frank J Flannery; Location 2: 1701 Druid Hill Avenue;  Occupation: physician  1890, Baltimore, Maryland. In 1900 they were living in Mt. Hope, Baltimore, Maryland, Frank J., physician, born May 1858, age 42, married 17 years. Ella M. wife, born Dec. 1862, age 37 had 3 children, 1 living.  Ella B. born Oct 1888, Maryland, age 11 at school.  Also there was her niece, Ida J. Ward, born Sept 1880, at school. In 1920 they were living in Baltimore (Independant City) Ward 28.  He was age 61, a physician in the hospital.  His parents were born in Ireland.  Ella M. was age 56 born in WV.  Eleanor B. was age 31, born in Maryland and married to Charles C. Conlon who was age 32, born in Maryland.  Two grandchildren: Charles C. Jr. age 3 y10m and Andrew J. age 6 months, born in Maryland. 1930 Frank 71 and Ella 65 were living in the Mt. Hope Retreat on Resiterstown Road.

 

Children of Ella Brannon and Frank Flannery are:

122             i.    Mary6 Flannery.

123            ii.    Mary Gertrude Flannery.

+      124           iii.    Eleanor B. Flannery, born October 1888 in Maryland.

 

Generation No. 4

 

58.  Susan “Sue” Ella6 Hall (Amanda Jane5 Arnold, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 25 April 1862 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 30 May 1943 in Moffitt, Arkansas. Burial: 01 June 1943, Prairie Grove, Arkansas. She married Ezra Irvin Hall 26 December 1894 in Lewis County, West Virginia, son of Ezra Hall and Martha Anderson.  He was born 05 August 1859 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia45, and died 29 December 1945 in Prairie Grove, Arkansas. He died at age 86y4m24d. Burial: 01 January 1946, Billingsly Cemetery, Prairie Grove, Arkansas46

 

Sketch from unknown newspaper article:

“E. I. Hall:  Professor E. I. Hall was born near Weston, W. Va, August 5, 1859, and was educated in the country schools of his native state, the state normal school and at Mount Union College, Ohio; at the latter of which places he graduated after a four years’ course of instruction.  He entered school at the age of six and, on account of his studious habits, quickness at learning and uniform correctness of deportment, his teacher soon promised him to the dictionary class with the advanced pupils.  Mr. Hall is a self educated man in this sense, he has made his opportunities and improved them.  While a mere boy he longed for the time when he could become a teacher, that noblest of all profession in which the child mind is developed, and such character formed as neither time can destroy – nor eternity harm.

He, at the early age of 15 years began life for himself by engaging to teach a country school –success was his and he was employed to teach the school the following years.  His best work in West Virginia was done while principal of the public schools at Buckhannon and as principal of the state normal school at Glenville.

Professor Hall came to Texas in August, 1885 and since that time has been engaged in school work as superintendent of the public schools of (Dublin) Temple, professor of mathematics in Centenery college at Lampasus, and is superintendent of the public schools of Marlin.  He has had much and successful experience in summer normal work, is vice-president of the State Teachers Association, scholarly a Christian gentleman and is considered one of the leading school men of the state. He has been eminently successful in his work as superintendent of our city schools, and has a bright future before him.

 

Children of Susan Hall and Ezra Hall are:

125             i.    Female7 Hall.  She married A. E./N Evans. Residence: Norman, Oklahoma, in 1943.

126            ii.    John Irwin Hall, born 25 December 1898 in probably Texas; died 13 July 1978 in Prairie Grove, Arkansas.  He married Nina Lumpkin.Burial: 15 July 1978, Billingsly Cemetery, Prairie Grove, Arkansas

 

60.  Lillian Gladys “Gay”6 Hall (Amanda Jane5 Arnold, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 13 February 1865 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 02 December 1917.  She married Charles D. Little 30 April 1891, son of M. Little and Mary M..  He was born 1872, and died 1932.

Child of Lillian Hall and Charles Little is:

127             i.    Russie C.7 Little, born 1898; died 1932. Burial: Abrams Run, Lewis County, West Virginia

 

64.  Wayne K.6 Hall (Amanda Jane5 Arnold, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born Bet. 09 – 10 December 1872 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 12 June 1937 in Walkersville, Lewis County, West Virginia.  Burial: Aft. 12 June 1937, Hall Cemetery, Abram’s Run, Lewis County, West Virginia. He married Dora B. Craig October 1907.  She was born 24 January 1874, and died 05 March 1937. Burial: March 1937, Hall Cemetery, Abram’s Run, Lewis County, West Virginia

 

Child of Wayne Hall and Dora Craig is:

128             i.    Ralph K.7 Hall, born 22 July 1908; died 17 August 1969.  He married Audrey M. Simon; born Abt. 1914.

 

65.  John Earl6 Hall (Amanda Jane5 Arnold, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 29 July 1877 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia.  Burial: Hall Cemetery, Abram’s Run, Lewis County, West Virginia. He married Gertrude Lynch, daughter of John Lynch and Laura Jordon.  She was born 28 December 1881 in Middle Fork, Randolph County, West Virginia, and died 20 October 1972 in Walkersville, Lewis County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 20 October 1972, Hall Cemetery, Abram’s Run, Lewis County, West Virginia

 

Children of John Hall and Gertrude Lynch are:

129             i.    Virginia H.7 Hall, born 1908; died 11 October 1988.  She married Bright J. McWhorter; born 09 July 1911; died 12 October 1989. Both buried Hall Cemetery, Abram’s Run, Lewis County, West Virginia.

Military service: Pvt. US Army WWII

130            ii.    Robert “Punk” Hall, born 19 November 1912; died 25 January 1984. Burial: Aft. 25 January 1984, Hall Cemetery, Abram’s Run, Lewis County, West Virginia. He married Catherine Duncan. There is a tombstone in the Hall Cemetery for her but no death date.

131           iii.    John Strange III Hall, born 21 February 1910; died 25 January 1971 in Baltimore, Maryland.  He married Martha Pauline Harmon Bet. 09 – 11 November 1939; born 1919.

 

      66.  Worth C.6 Hall (Amanda Jane5 Arnold, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born Bet. 06 – 07 November 1879 in Jacksonville, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 10 December 1955 in South Charleston, West Virginia.  He married Minnie F. Bennett.  She died 21 February 1954.

Child of Worth Hall and Minnie Bennett is:

132             i.    Marvin7 Hall. He was in Charleston, WV in 1955

 

67.  Eugenia “Jean”  Porter6 Arnold (Porter M.5, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 25 February 1901 in West Virginia, and died 31 January 1991 in Hackettstown, New Jersey.  She married Edward Conrad Smith 25 August 1928.  He died Bef. 1991. He was the author of History of Lewis County, 1920.

Child of Eugenia Arnold and Edward Smith is:

133             i.    Susan Porter7 Smith. Susan lived in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, retired editorial researcher for Reader’s Digest (Jean’s obit.)

 

 

71.  John Porter6 Arnold (Porter M.5, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 10 April 1910 in West Virginia, and died March 1947 in Akron, Ohio.  He died complications of the flu. He married Wilda Beach in Oakland, Maryland.  She was born 1910, and died 1968.

Early in the war he went to Akron, Ohio, and was employed with the Railroad. He was a member of St. Paul’s Espiscopal Church and the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen.

Children of John Arnold and Wilda Beach are:

134             i.    John Porter II7 Arnold.

135            ii.    Jacqueline S. Arnold.

136           iii.    Irwin Beach Arnold.

137           iv.    Anne Arnold.

 

73.  Eleanor6 Gillan (Maude A.5 Arnold, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1)  She married Short.

Children of Eleanor Gillan and Short are:

138             i.    Unknown7 Short.

139            ii.    Unknown Short.

140           iii.    Unknown Short.

 

75.  Raymond F.6 Arnold (George F. A.5, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 21 September 1906 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  He married Mildred Bragg 09 April 1938 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  She was born 25 October 1912 in Cutlips, Braxton County, West Virginia.

He wrote a sketch about his grandfather.

Children of Raymond Arnold and Mildred Bragg are:

141             i.    Bertie June7 Arnold, born 26 December 1942 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married Michael R. Wolfe 09 January 1966; born 09 January 1944 in Tulsa County, Oklahoma.

142            ii.    Maude Eleanor Arnold, born 06 October 1944 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married Christopher Joseph Schmidt 04 April 1964; born 05 May 1941 in Jersey City, Hudson County, New Jersey.

143           iii.    Catherine West Arnold, born 12 April 1948 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married (1) Gary Alan Beimer; born 20 June 1940.  She married (2) Leslie Jack Ragan 10 January 1964.

 

76.  George Jackson6 Arnold (George F. A.5, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 23 September 1908 in Arnold, Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 06 May 1955 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia47. He married Vivienne Lorraine Ervin in Ashland, Boyd County, Kentucky, daughter of George Ervin and Lillie Conrad.  She was born 06 April 1918 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

Arnold was a graduate of Walkersville High School, a farmer, rural mail carrier and a mason.

Vivienne remarried to Joseph Michael Swanton on 14 May 1959

Child of George Arnold and Vivienne Ervin is:

144             i.    Sharon Lyn7 Arnold, born 25 July 1943 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married Nicholas Mihnovels; born 24 June 1939 in Ukraine, now Poland. He was a Green beret in Special Forces in Vietnam.

 

77.  Eleanor6 Arnold (George F. A.5, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 08 December 1910 in Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married Lewis Jackson Linger 01 September 1932 in Oakland, Garrett County, Maryland, son of Edwin Linger and Julia Clark.  He was born 20 September 1909 in Big Skin, Vandalia, West Virginia.

Children of Eleanor Arnold and Lewis Linger are:

145             i.    Ann Louise7 Linger.

146            ii.    Edwin Arnold Linger, born 19 November 1935 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  He married Ann Kitzmiller; born 01 September 1938 in Philippi, Barbour County, West Virginia.

147           iii.    Lewis Jackson II Linger, born 17 July 1951 in Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

78.  Evelyn6 Arnold (George F. A.5, George Jackson4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 11 August 1914 in Arnold Hill, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married John Harold Simmons 13 August 1934 in Glenville, Gilmer County, West Virginia.  He was born 30 April 1909 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died 15 December 1963. Burial: Aft. 15 December 1963, Masonic Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia

      Information from Rohrbough book and Evelyn A. Simmons of Weston, West Virginia.

 

Children of Evelyn Arnold and John Simmons are:

148             i.    Barbara Ann7 Simmons, born 16 May 1935 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married Denzil Jackson White Jr. 15 October 1951.

149            ii.    Carol Evelyn Simmons, born 08 April 1938 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married John Lynn White 17 July 1966.

150           iii.    Martha Jane Simmons, born 10 April 1946 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married David Tierney 04 July 1964.

 

82.  Josephine A.6 Hall (George William5, Mary Elizabeth4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born November 1886, and died December 1917. She married Pierre Wilson.

Child of Josephine Hall and Pierre Wilson is:

151             i.    Infant7 Wilson. Burial: Hall Cemetery, Gordon Hall Farm, Lewis County, West Virginia/

 

84.  Georgie Christian6 Hall (George William5, Mary Elizabeth4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 09 August 1890 in Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married Scott Rohrbough 27 December 1909, son of Nicholas Rohrbough and Sarah West.  He was born 18 September 1880 in Lewis County, West Virginia, and died in probably St. Louis, Missouri.

Child of Georgie Hall and Scott Rohrbough is:

152             i.    Son7 Rohrbough.

 

87.  Virginia6 Hall (George William5, Mary Elizabeth4 Arnold, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born September 1899 in Roanoke, Lewis County, West Virginia.  She married (1) O’Brien Bef. 1931.    She married (2) Walter Boykin Beale 27 March 1931.

Child of Virginia Hall and O’Brien is:

153             i.    Female7 O’Brien.

 

93.  Mary Prudence6 McClellen (Floride “Flodie”5 Arnold, William Edward4, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born 08 March 1886 in Cincinnati, Hamilton County, Ohio, and died 14 July 1973 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 14 July 1973, Masonic Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. She married Charles Albert O’Hara 15 April 1920.  He was born 08 October 1883, and died 26 August 1967. Burial: Aft. 26 August 1967, Masonic Cemetery, Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia.

Charles was a bank teller and a florist. She was a member of the St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Weston, WV and a member of many church organizations, including the Altar Guild and served as Choir Mother for a number of years. She was a member and past regent of the Trans-Allegheny Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution and also of the Women’s Federated Club.  She was an active business woman, greatly interested in farming and saw to the operation of a large acreage in Collins Settlement district at Jacksonville, West Virginia.

 

Child of Mary McClellen and Charles O’Hara is:

154             i.    Albert Edward7 O’Hara.  He married Jeanne Ann Nowische.

 

114.  Ida Jane6 Warder (Ida Jackson5 Brannon, Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie”, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born September 1890, and died 1976. Burial: 1976, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia

She married Robert J. Ray Abt. 1918.  He was born 28 January 1888 in Woodlawn, Pennsylvania, and died 1939 in Weston, Lewis County, West Virginia. Robert died at age 51 years at his home.  He was Mayor of Weston for the four years prior to his death. Burial: 1939, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia

In 1900 she was living with her aunt Ella Flannery in Baltimore, Maryland and was attending school there.

Child of Ida Warder and Robert Ray is:

155             i.    John Warder7 Ray, born 10 February 1919 in Lewis County, West Virginia; died 13 October 1933 in Clarksburg, Harrison County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 13 October 1933, Machpelah Cemetery, Lewis County, West Virginia.

 

115.  Mary6 Whelan (Mary Hortense “Mamie”5 Brannon, Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie”, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born June 1880.  She marriedGeorge Norvell.

Children of Mary Whelan and George Norvell are:

156             i.    Martha7 Norvell.

157            ii.    George Jr. Norvell.

 

124.  Eleanor B.6 Flannery (Ella Virginia5 Brannon, Henrietta Jane4 “Hattie”, Prudence3 Jackson, George2, John1) was born October 1888 in Maryland.  She married Charles C. Conlon.  He was born 1887 in Maryland.

Charles was vice president of an insurance company in 1930, Baltimore, Maryland.

Children of Eleanor Flannery and Charles Conlon are:

158             i.    Charles C.7 Conlon, born 1916 in Maryland.

159            ii.    Andrew J. Conlon, born Bet. 1919 – 1920 in Maryland.

160           iii.    Francis Conlon, born 1926 in Maryland.

Endnotes

 

1.  Porter Arnold’s Birth Certificate, Name of his mother is listed.

2.  Mason County Illinois Marriages, Marriage License #512: Old Record Box 320, letter to Marilyn Pumphrey on 3 Oct 1989 from William R. Blessman, Mason County Clerk, Havana, Illinois.

3.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk:1:163.

4.  Weston Democrat, Obit, 6 November 1900. She was age 29.

5.  Weston Democrat, Obit: Friday, 4 October 1907.

6.  Lewis County Marriage Records, Bk:5:249, Bondsmen: Elijah Arnold and Joseph Hall.

7.  Weston Democrat, Obit: 18 Feb 1914.

8.  Lewis County Birth Records, Bk:1:97.

9.  Prominent Men of West Virginia, 538, Birthplace.

10.  Harrison County Marriages, by Wes Cockran.

11.  Collins Settlement of Old, 83.

12.  Weston Herald, Obit: 26 July 1858.

13.  Weston Democrat, 7 and 14 July 1911.

14.  Lewis County Marriage Records, Bk6:209.

15.  Weston Democrat, page 65, 1920 obits by Newman.

16.  Weston Democrat, Obit: Friday 8 Nov 1907.

17.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk1:101, Her husband was informant.

18.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk:1:37, father informant.

19.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk1:139, Jan. 9, 20.  Lewis County Marriage Records, Bk:8:63.

21.  Upshur County Birth Record, Bk1:42:63, birth record says ‘son’. death record ‘daughter’.

22.  Upshur County Death Record, Bk1:62:53.

23.  Upshur County Birth Record, Bk:1:55.

24.  Upshur County Birth Record, Bk:1:61.

25.  Weston Democrat, Friday, 22 March 1912.

26.  Lewis County Marriage Records, Bk7:238, by S. K Vought.  They were married at the home of her brother, Jackson Arnold in Weston.

27.  Weston Democrat, Friday 17 Nov 1914.

28.  John R. Rohrbough Vol. II, by James D. Rohrbough, and a sketch written by Raymond F. Arnold were the main sources for this family.

29.  Weston Democrat, 13 Nov. 1914. Obit.

30.  Lewis County Death Records, He died of inflammation of the bowels. His father-in-law reported his death.

31.  Weston Democrat, Obit: Friday 26  April 1912.

32.  Lewis County Birth Records, p. 18.

33.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk5:2, He dided at age 71y11m.

34.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk1:205, She died of consumption at age 24.

35.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk1:163, Father reporting.

36.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk1;191.

37.  Weston Republican, 12 December 1891.

38.  Weston Independent, Obit; 4 Sept 1900.

39.  Upshur County Birth Record, Bk:1:52.

40.  Upshur County Birth Record, Bk:2:146.

41.  Upshur County Birth Record, Bk:1:70.

42.  “Our Neighbors”, Memoirs of Upshur County, 1875-1950 by French Morgan.

43.  Weston Republican, 8 May 1886 – obit.

44.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk5:44, She died at ag e63y11m9d.

45.  Lewis County Birth Records, Bk:1:85.

46.  Luginbuel Funeral Home, Prairie Grove, Arkansas, research of Ada Lea Fitz.

47.  Lewis County Death Records, Bk7:10, He died at age 46y6m13d.


[i] Document about John Jackson and descendants.  The cover says written by Col. Jackson Arnold.  Document added by Mary Prudence (McClellan) O’Hara and possibly others, pages 32-41. Found in HCPD Library, Horner, Lewis County, West Virginia.

[ii] Prominent Men of West Virginia, originally published in 1890, pgs. 475-476.

Submitted by Linda Meyers January 2007.

Last update April 19, 2013 by Dan Hyde.