John Jay Jackson

Descendants of John Jay Jackson

Generation No. 1

1. John Jay4 Jackson (John George3, George2, John1) was born 13 February 1800 in Wood County, (West) Virginia, and died 01 January 1877 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 01 July 1877, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Will: 07 July 1873, Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia1. He married (1) Emma G. Beeson 29 June 1823 in Wood County, (West) Virginia, daughter of Col. Jacob Beeson. She was born April 1800, and died 18 July 1842 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 18 July 1842, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, West Virginia. He married (2) Jane E. B. Gardner 17 July 1843 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, daughter of Andrew Gardner. She was born 30 December 1817 in Uniontown, Fayette County, Pennsylvania, and died 30 September 1896 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 30 September 1896, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

 

Early in life the Jackson’s lived on Fourth Street where at least three of the children were born. General Jackson purchased his first town lot in Parkersburg in 1829, where he built a larger home in a grove on the corner of Ann Street and Second or Third Streets. This beautiful two-story home faced Neale’s Island on the north and Blennerhassett Island to the south. On 14 June 1860 John and family were living in Parkersburg. He was a lawyer age 60, with real estate valued at $50,000 and personal property value of $15,000. In addition to his family was his married daughter America Small, age 30, and two servants, Margaret Lang, age 21 from Ireland, and Hugh McGail, age 18 from Ireland. On 19 July 1870 he was living in 1st Ward Parkersburg. He was a retired lawyer with real estate value at $15,000 and personal property value at $6,000. In 1850 J. J. Jackson owned 7 slaves, 3 black males ages 80, 31 and 10; 4 black females ages 65, 23,14 and 3. In 1860 slaves enumerated in the J. J. Jackson Sr. household were 1 black female age 70 and 1 black female age 13/18 – she was a fugitive from state.
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John Jay Jackson
The General

Of all the descendants of John and Elizabeth Cummins Jackson, General John Jay Jackson and his family were probably the most prominent in politics and in society. John Jay was born Jack Triplett on 13 February 1800 in Wood County, West Virginia. He was the illegitimate son of then Congressman John George Jackson of Clarksburg and Frances Emelia Triplett of near Parkersburg. Early childhood was spent with his mother’s family near Parkersburg and here he received his primary education under the direction of Dr. David Creel. At the age of 10, primarily due to the persuasion of his father’s second wife Mary Meigs Jackson, who had known the lad, Jack moved to the Jackson home in Clarksburg, Harrison County, West Virginia and assumed the name John Jay Jackson.
In Clarksburg he studied at the Randolph Academy, one of the best schools in the country, under the direction of Dr. Tower, a gentleman of culture. Possessing “quick perceptive faculties and manifesting, even when very young, an aptitude for study and fondness for books” John Jay made rapid progress and at the age of thirteen entered Washington College in Pennsylvania. His stay at this institute was brief. After one year he received an appointment to West Point from President James Monroe and entered the academy on 15 March 1815. Less than four years later, at age 19, he graduated and on 24 July 1818 was commissioned 2nd lieutenant Regular Army of the United States attached to Corps of Artillery. He was ordered to garrison service at Norfolk Virginia. On 1 December 1819 he was transferred to the Fourth Infantry, 2nd Lieutenant on recruiting.
During the year 1820, and part of 1821, he performed active service in Florida, in the Seminole war. While stationed in Pensacola, the routine of military life was temporarily interrupted by an order to report at Washington headquarters. The trip between these two places, though not a short one even now with railroad facilities for the passage, in that primitive day had to be performed on horseback. Lieutenant Jackson promptly mounted his charger and rode all the way to the National Capital without a halt, save each night, traversing the States of Florida, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland. Upon reporting in person at the War Office, he was ordered to Baltimore on recruiting service, where he immediately presented himself, traveling solitarily as he had from Pensacola. After a few days in Baltimore, he received orders to report for duty again at Pensacola, and mounting the same horse he rode through Cumberland to Parkersburg, crossed the river there, traveled through Ohio to Maysville, at which point he re-crossed the river, and pushing on through Kentucky and Tennessee–then a wilderness and populated by Indians of the Cherokee tribe–he reached his destination, having traveled, alone and upon the same horse, a distance of more than three thousand miles. Like his cousin, “Stonewall” Jackson, he was at home in the saddle. And, when the writer of this was a boy, he remembers distinctly of frequently seeing the General ride rapidly past from his farm toward his city home on a pacing steed, so gracefully and energetically that rider and pacer seemed one.
In May 1821 he was commissioned adjutant of the Fourth Infantry, and transferred to regimental headquarters at Montpelier, Alabama. At this place, and at Pensacola, during the years 1821 and 1822, he performed staff duties, as a member of General Andrew Jackson’s military family. In October, 1822, he visited Parkersburg on a furlough of six months; and resigned his commission in the army of the United States about the 1st of January, 1823. He now chose the Law as his profession, and with his accustomed zeal and energy, he at once set himself to master the principals of the legal science, as a necessary prerequisite to success and eminence at the Bar. By the courtesy of the County Court, he was permitted to appear in cases pending before it almost as soon as he began to study. He found this privilege of such advantage to himself, that he was often heard to speak of this court with approbation as being an admirable school for the training and development of the young practitioner. He would never engage in the tirade against this part of our State judiciary, although the system in these latter days cannot be regarded as at all comparable with County Courts in the earlier days of the Commonwealth. He liked upon it as an old friend, and, true to one of the loveliest traits of his character, – that of adhering to his friends in storm as well as in sunshine, – he continued a warm advocate of this court even to the end. (Atkinson, George W., Prominent Men of West Virginia, W. L. Gallin, Wheeling, West Virginia 1890.)

John Jay was licensed to practice law on 28 April 1823 and was recognized as one of the leading lawyers of West Virginia maintaining this position until the end. At home he played a prominent role in the government of the city:

1826-1855 District prosecuting attorney of the court of oyer and terminer for Wood County, Virginia
1830-1852 District prosecuting attorney circuit superior court. Retired in 1852.
1842-1855 District prosecuting attorney of the superior court of Ritchie County, Virginia.
1825- First of six terms as representative, House of Delegates of Virginia for Wood County. Re-appointed: 1830, 1838, 1839, 1842, 1844.
1842-1861 Commissioned brigadier general of 33rd Brigade of Militia of Virginia. Remained on post until outbreak of the Civil War.
1 January 1861- Spoke against secession at the mass meeting held at the Wood County courthouse “a great Union meeting was …at Parkersburg featuring speeches by General J. J. Jackson, J. M. Stephenson, A. I. Boreman and J. J. Jackson, Jr. General Jackson was chairman of the committee submitting a preamble and resolutions that were adopted with but one dissenting vote. Committeemen came out against secession…The Parkersburg Resolutions, as they were called, set forth that the proposed call for a Virginia legislative convention to consider the state’s stand upon the revolutionary movement of South Carolina was but a Southern ruse.”
1861– Represented Wood County at the historic Secession Convention held in Richmond and was “so vigorous in his opposition to Virginia’s separation from the Union that it has been reported he had difficulty in getting out of the capitol alive.” ,
13-15 May 1861- After Virginia joined the Confederate States of America on 17 April 1861 two conventions were held at Wheeling, (West) Virginia. John Jay attended the first convention appointed to the Committee on State and Federal Relations. The ultimate result of the conventions was the establishment of the Reorganized State of Virginia – the succession of northwestern Virginia from the remainder of the state. Jackson resisted the new state movement – he viewed the creation of a new state from another without the consent of the principal legislature to be unconstitutional. His loyalties were questioned and his family was divided – James Monroe had refused to take the loyalty oath and Jacob Beeson was arrested and imprisoned for making disloyal utterances. Sometimes federal soldiers entered his home at Third and Ann streets and taunted his family or looted and overturned furniture. Unfortunately, members of the Jackson family, except for John Jay, Jr., were tainted with Copperheadism throughout and after the war. James Monroe and Jacob Beeson were able to pursue their political careers only after the Democrats redeemed the state in 1870.
1871 – Commission to adjust the proportion of Virginia debt to be assumed by West Virginia.
1876 – Presidential canvass.

In political sentiment, he belonged to the school of the distinguished patriots Henry Clay and Daniel Webster, believed in public improvements by the General Government, Protection to American Industries, and in a liberal construction of fundamental law for the welfare and benefit of the people, in who capability for self-rule and wise legislation he ardently trusted. In the historic convention of 1861, which met at Richmond when clouds of war hovered darkly on the horizon, he was a member, sent with unanimous vote from the shores of the Ohio, to voice the loyalty and conservatism of his stalwart constituency. In that turbulent assembly he was noted for his eloquence, fervor and unfaltering devotion to “the Union, the constitution, and the enforcement of the laws.” almost risking his life in efforts to protect the interests of his people in Western Virginia, and stay the fury of secession. Upon his return home, the people with intense interest assembled to hear his clear and concise report of his efforts and the spirit which prevailed in the tidewater counties. He counseled firmness in the assertion of their rights under the constitution, but moderation and wisdom in the execution of their whishes. Here, with his public report to the people among whom he grew up and prospered, and whom he loved, practically ended his public career, and in subsequent years, while his gifted sons took position in the contentions and duties of the hour, he retired to the more pleasant occupation of private business and home quietude. Nevertheless, he lost not his interest in events rapidly forming national history, or in the welfare of his city, county and State. All that concerned the interest of either, found a welcome place in his heart; and he sought the good of his people, by setting them an example of frugality and industry. He had studied well the principles on which our complex system of government was based and was ever ready to give his countrymen a reason for that line of policy which he felt it incumbent on him to pursue. Hence, during and after the war he made several speeches, in all of which he exhorted to mutual forbearance, reconciliation and love, and counseled all to stand by the Constitution, as that instrument was expounded by the fathers in the purest and best days of the Republic. While he would have no compromise with the fanaticism which would overthrow and destroy the best system of government ever devised by the wisdom of man, yet he was always conservative in his feelings and actions.

On the social, economic and cultural scene in Parkersburg John Jay was duly as active: “He was active in every enterprise for the benefit of his community and served as mayor. When the Baltimore & Ohio railway sought right of way from the Potomac to the Ohio, he urged needed legislation and was one of the earliest and largest contributors to the subscription stock toward the building of the Northwestern Virginia railroad.”

9 February 1829- One of five incorporators of the Parkersburg Manufacturing Company for the purpose of manufacturing cotton, hemp, wool, flax, flour and Indian meal
24 February 1844- Present at the second organizational meeting for the Presbyterian Church.
1832-33- Started a temperance movement in Parkersburg – next decade assisted in the Washingtonian temperance movement.
4 June 1847- Charter member of “Parkersburg Division No. 58, Sons of Temperance.”
1838- Purchased The Parkersburg Republican – changed name to The Parkersburg Gazette and West Virginia Courier.
1843- Was one of the first four communicants of the Trinity Episcopal Church – became lay leader in charge in absence of priest.
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An Old Landmark
Being Removed to Make a Place For a New Business Block

Work was commenced Monday to move the old Jackson homestead, on Fourth street, opposite Logan’s livery stables, to the Andrews property on Juliana just above Fourth street. The house was bought from Dr. Muhleman by F. P. Moats, who will improve it somewhat and convert it into an office. The house is one of the oldest landmarks in the city, being nearly 100 years of age.
It was the birthplace of John Jay Jackson, and Judge J. M. Jackson and their sister, Mrs. Dickinson, was also born there.
Judge J. J. Jackson went to housekeeping there after his marriage about fifty years ago and Miss Lily Irene Jackson was born there. The property passed out of the Jackson family’s hands many years ago. In speaking of it Monday Judge J. J. Jackson said that had he known it was for sale he would have purchased it and kept it in the family on account of its many associations. A part of the old building is of logs but was weather boarded many years ago. (Parkersburg State Journal,13 April 1899)
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Emma G. Beeson
by Stephen C. Shaw

Sketches of Northwestern Virginia, January 1877
The third child of the late Col. Jacob Beeson was his daughter, the late Mrs. Emma G. Jackson. She was born at their residence in this county, in April 1800. On the 29th day of June 1823, she became the companion and wife of our honored citizen, Gen. John Jay Jackson.
He having by this marriage, connecting himself with the family of Col. Beeson, and through his children by that connection, we trace the descendants of Col. Beeson…
…The females as well as the males born in our county in those years of its first settlement did not and could not have access to and enjoy the educational advantages and privileges now so common in our country. The want of these educational advantages caused those in those early times to use greater diligence in improving their limited opportunities and thus qualifying themselves to meet and discharge all the duties of life.
Mrs. Jackson inherited a quick versatile mind and an easy flow of language with remarkable reflection faculties qualifying her to fill with ease and grace her position in society. The education acquired in those years of her young womanhood under these adverse circumstances was real and were made to supply and fill the varied wants required in the discharge of the active duties and responsibilities of life. To her and her husband were born three sons and four daughters who lived to attain to man and womanhood. Of each of them we will give a brief account in this number.
In the winter of 1833, at the time of the formation of the first Presbyterian church in this county, growing out of the labors of the late Rev. James McAboy, she became one of its communicants and remained in that church until her death, which occurred on the 18th of July 1842, in the forty-third year of her age.
In closing this sketch of Mrs. Jackson – one who filled an important position in this community, when Parkersburg numbered but a few inhabitants, a feeling of sadness comes over us. The mind goes back to those years when her life was in its meridian and the fond and loving hopes of the mother were watching with tender care and solicitude, the developments of the minds of those she must shortly leave, while those minds were brightened on the future.
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Obit: Died, Mrs. Emma G. Jackson

In this place, at half past 9 o’clock last night, in the 42nd year of her age, Mrs. Emma G. Jackson, wife of J. J. Jackson, Esq. By this event, a husband and seven children have sustained an irreparable loss. Mrs. Jackson was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and during her protracted illness, and particularly, during the last few days of her life, she enjoyed to a high degree the consolations of the religion which she had possessed for nearly ten years.
The friends of the family, and the public generally, are invited to attend at the residence of Mr. Jackson tomorrow morning at 9 o’clock, and proceed thence to the Presbyterian Church, where the funeral services will be performed. (Parkersburg Gazette, July 14, 1842.)

Emma’s tombstone reads: “A Tribute To The Memory of Emma, Erected by Her Husband John J. Jackson, Born 4/1803; Died In The Believers Hope 7/1842, Precious In The Sight Of The Lord, Is The Death of His Saints.” Psalm 116,15.
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A Family Legend

There are several sketches in regards to John Jay Jackson Jr. who obviously was a powerful community figure during his lifetime. However, there is a family legend in regards to his judgeship and how it was obtained which differs from those recorded in the annals of history by various authors.

The legend goes that while John J. Jr. was home on school break he fell in love with an attractive Parkersburg girl named Jane Gardner, whom he planned to marry when his education was completed and law practice established. In the interim his mother died and his father chose Jane as his second wife.
John Jr. swallowed his pride and went on to marry Carrie Glime. They began their married life in the old Jackson home and after the Civil War moved to “Carrinda” at 519 Seventh Street when it was completed in 1867.
The delegates comprising the Virginia Legislature were called into session in Richmond to vote on whether the State of Virginia would secede from the Union and join the Confederate states. General John Jay Jackson led the delegates from the western frontier [note this is where the stories differ as others say it was John Jay Jr. who was the delegate, and there is a newspaper article (above) that says he was at the Richmond Convention] which refused to secede and then laid the groundwork for the future state of West Virginia. This session was so tense that the delegates from western Virginia questioned whether they could get out of Richmond with their lives.
President Lincoln needed to fill the vacancy in the federal judgeship from Western Virginia. He had heard of the part played by John Jay Jackson in holding the western country from seceding, that he was a fine lawyer, the one most capable to be named.
In those days when one traveled he was away for weeks and John Jay Jackson Sr., was away from Parkersburg when the commission arrived in the mail addressed to John Jay Jackson. John Jr. opened it and accepted the commission, as there was no designation as to senior or junior. It was his chance to get even with his father who had married his girl friend. When the general returned and learned of it he flew into a rage. Then he began to take into account he was an old man while his son was young, that the boy was a bright lawyer, that he had done him wrong by marrying Jane. Maybe it would prove for the best if he did not interfere.

Children of John Jackson and Emma Beeson are:
+ 2   i. John Jay5 Jackson, born 04 August 1824 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 01 September 1907 in Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey.
+ 3  ii. James Monroe Jackson, born 03 December 1825 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 14 February 1901 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
+ 4 iii. Eliza Clinch Jackson, born 22 October 1827 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 07 March 1851 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia.
+ 5 iv. Jacob Beeson Jackson, born 06 April 1829 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 11 December 1893 in Wood County, West Virginia.
6 v. America Jackson, born 1831 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 31 October 1919 in Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: 02 November 1919, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married William H. Small 02 February 1857 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; born about 1829 in Baltimore, Baltimore (city), Maryland; died about July 1879.
They were married at the home of General J. J. Jackson. William died around July 1879. America presented his will for probate on 16 July 1879. America was living with her father, alone, in 1860, but they both were living in Baltimore, Maryland in January 1879. In 1870 America was age 38, born in Virginia, living in Parkersburg. William was age 40, lawyer, born in Maryland with a real estate value of $40,000. Living with them was Thomas Dulin, white male, age 28, born in Virginia and Bridget Malony, white female, age 30, domestic, born in Ireland. In Parkersburg she resided on Ann Street in the house, which later became the Moose Lodge.
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America Jackson
by Stephen C. Shaw

The fifth child of Gen. John J. Jackson by his first wife, Mrs. Emma Beeson Jackson is Mrs. America Small, the companion and wife of our worthy citizen, Wm. H. Small, Esq., a practicing attorney in all the various courts of this and the surrounding counties of the State. Mr. Small is a native of the city of Baltimore, in the State of Maryland. He was there raised and received his education, and at the time of the location and construction of the Northwestern Virginia Railway he was one of the principal engineers in that inland improvement passing through the State from east to west.
After the completion of that horizontal raceway for the iron horse, from its junction with the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Grafton, to Parkersburg on the Ohio river, he returned to his native city, where he chose and studied law as his profession, passed his examination received his license and was admitted to practice at the bar in the Supreme Court in Baltimore city about the year 1860. Soon after that time he removed to this city, where he has since been engaged in the honorable duties of his profession.
His beautiful residence is pleasantly situated on the northwest side of Ann Street, overlooking and commanding a fine view of the Ohio river and the railway bridge spanning the same. One hundred feet above the bed of the stream. But a few private residences in our city presents to the traveler on this great thoroughfare a more pleasant and picturesque appearance.

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The State Journal says that Judge J. M. Jackson received on Saturday last a long and very interesting letter from his sister, Mrs. America Small, who has been making a tour of the old world. She gives a graphic description of the places which she has visited. The letter was dated at Rome and the writer stated she had stood on the very spot where Caesar fell and had visited many other places of interest in that part of the country. She contemplates a weeks visit in St. Petersburg. (March 14, 1885, Weston Democrat)
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Obit: Mrs. W. H. Small
Died Friday Evening at Home on Ann Street After Several Month’s Illness
Mrs. W. H. Small died yesterday evening at her home on Ann street after an illness of several months, and her passing brought to a close the life of a woman whose wealth of years crowned a life of singular devotion, influence and spiritual poise. Critically ill for weeks, even with the shadows touching her, this gentle woman, who had never failed to do her part in life, roused herself and was something of her former strength and for days pushed away from his path the grim angel whose sickle was poised for the stroke which would reap the harvest of a choice soul. Mrs. Small was a daughter of the late General Jackson and from this distinguished lineage she inherited a brilliant, lucid and virile mind which was thoroughly alive to the changed world in which she lived. Most diffident and retiring in disposition she never sought to reach outward or upward for selfish ends, but always to the less fortunate. No more loving sister or aunt ever lived, and while she bound all her kin with chains of love, yet she had a share of affection and sympathy for others, and for those in sorrow she had an especial feeling which was quickly translated into deeds of loving kindness. Mrs. Small maintained the womanly instincts of the past generation of West Virginia ladies and has left to her devoted relatives and friends only the memory of gentleness, purity and peace. She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Wm. H. Smith, two brothers, Henry C. Jackson of New York, and A. Gardner Jackson of this city, and a number of nephews and nieces. Mrs. Small was a life-long communicant of Trinity Episcopal church and the funeral will take place from there on Sunday afternoon at 4 o’clock and the interment will be in the family plot in Riverview cemetery.
+ 7 vi. Emma Beeson Jackson, born 1840 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 15 January 1871 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
8 vii. Anna Elizabeth Jackson, born November 1842 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 13 January 1882 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Baptism: 17 July 1843
Burial: 13 January 1882, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married Harwood Neal 20 April 1870 in Wood County, West Virginia; born 04 April 1846 in (West) Virginia; died 19 June 1889. Burial: 19 June 1889, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
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Anna E. Jackson
by Stephen C. Shaw

The seventh and youngest child is Miss Annie Jackson, who became the wife of Harwood Neal, second son of L. P. Neal, esq., of this city.
The above named three daughters of Gen. John J. Jackson by his first wife were well educated for the active duties of life, being graduates of different female institutions of our country. But enjoying no personal acquaintance with either of them, renders it impossible to present to the reader an outline view of the formation of their minds, further than to say that they shared, and still share largely, in the respect, esteem and confidence of the community.
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Harwood was a merchant at the time of the marriage. In 1880 they are living in Parkersburg with one white female servant, Nora McGrady, age 22, born in West Virginia, her parents in Ireland; and Alger Fitzgerald, black male age 26, domestic servant, born in Maryland, as were his parents.

Children of John Jackson and Jane Gardner are:
+ 9 i. Frances Belle5 Jackson, born 18 September 1846 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 22 January 1912 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
10 ii. Henry Clay Jackson, born 30 September 1847 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 06 August 1931 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 06 August 1931, Valhalla, Westchester County, New York. He married Annie O. DeCamp 27 April 1871 in Wood County, West Virginia; born Bet. 1851 – 1853 in Wellsburg, Brooke County, West Virginia; died 25 December 1924 in New York City, New York County, New York. Burial: Aft. 25 December 1924, Kensico Cemetery, Valhalla, Westchester County, New York.
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Henry C. Jackson

He was educated at Washington and Lee and in the University of Virginia and spent the greater part of his life in Parkersburg, West Virginia, where he was identified with the business life of the town. He was a partner in the wholesale firm of Thompson and Jackson, and later was the head of the H. C. Jackson and Company Wholesale House. Mr. Jackson served as mayor of Parkersburg and was associated with other interests in his hometown. He married Annie O. DeCamps, of the Wellsburg family and the home of the Jacksons on (411) Seventh street, where the Y.W.C.A. now has its quarters was considered one of the most delightful in the city. Here Mrs. Jackson dispensed hospitality, which won her the distinction of being the perfect hostess. She died December 24, 1924 in New York City where Mr. Jackson at the present time is engaged successfully in the banking business.
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Obit: Jackson Funeral Held Yesterday

Take Body to New York Where Burial Will be Made This Afternoon
Funeral services for Henry C. Jackson, former mayor of Parkersburg and at one time president of the Little Kanawha Railroad company, who died at the home of his sister, Mrs. William Haines Smith, Twelfth and Juliana streets, Thursday evening, were held in the Smith home Friday afternoon, Dr. S. Scollay Moore, rector emeritus of Trinity Episcopal church, officiated.
The body was taken late Friday night to Kensico, N. Y., where burial will be made at the side of his wife, in Valhalla. A. G. Jackson accompanied the body from here and will be joined at Baltimore, Md., by a nephew Charles S. Jackson and in New York by other relatives, and friends who will be present at the commitment services at Valhalla this afternoon at 5 o’clock. (Parkersburg News, August 8, 1931)
11 iii. Columbia Duncan Jackson, born 04 April 1852 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 07 March 1937 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 07 March 1937, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married William Haimes Smith 21 September 1875 in Wood County, West Virginia; born 16 February 1847 in Ripley, Jackson County, West Virginia; died 14 February 1929 in Elizabeth, Wirt County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 14 February 1929, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
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Obit: Death Claims Good Citizen

Mrs. W. H. Smith Jr., Succumbs at Hospital After Extended Illness
Mrs. William Haines Smith Jr. prominent and highly esteemed resident of Parkersburg and a member of one of the city’s old and distinguished families, died early Sunday morning at St. Joseph’s hospital after nine weeks’ illness.
Mrs. Smith was the widow of the late W. H. Smith, found of the W. H. Smith Hardware company on Third street and one of the oldest in West Virginia. Mr. Smith, who also was president of the former Central Bank and Trust company, died about eight years ago.
Mrs. Smith was the former Miss Collie Jackson and was the third child of General John Jay and Jane Gardner Jackson, pioneer family of this section. Taking an active and prominent part in social and civic affairs of the city, Mrs. Smith was particularly interested in the Daughters of the American Revolution, of which she served as national vice-president, state regent and vice state regent.
Mrs. Smith was active in the organization of the Parkersburg Women’s club and was one of its first presidents. She was a devout member of Trinity Episcopal church, and belonged to the Women’s auxiliary and founded the church periodical club in Parkersburg.
One of her greatest honors was to represent West Virginia at the Pan Anglican Congress at London in 1908 by appointment from the Rt. Rev. William Peterkin, Bishop of West Virginia.
Mrs. Smith’s home at 1425 Juliana street has long been noted for its hospitality and gracious charm.
She leaves one brother, A. Gardner Jackson, of this city, and several nieces and nephews.
Funeral services are to be held Tuesday at 3 o’clock from the home, in charge of the Rev. Dr. Joseph M. Waterman, rector of Trinity church. Interment will be in Riverview (Cook) cemetery.
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A friend contributed the following eulogy:

“In those days of rush and hurry and changed standards, we do not always find ideal womanhood, such as Parkersburg lost yesterday; one who held an almost unique place among us. Petted and indulged in her girlhood, feted and courted in her young ladyhood, she married the man of her choice and became a devoted wife and homemaker, filling at the same time, a leading place in society, the community, and her church which was so dear to her. How she cherished her ideals! duty, loyalty and the highest in life. Year by year, growing finer and finer till she finished an almost perfectly fulfilled life.” (The Parkersburg Sentinel, March 8, 1937)
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Collie Jackson Smith

Mrs. William Haines Smith, Collie Jackson is a well known resident of Parkersburg today. She is the third child of General John Jay and Jane G. Jackson and is too generally known to Parkersburg people to make more than passing comment. She has been honored with many offices which have carried distinction. Among these have been that of vice-president general of N.S. D. A. R. She now holds the office of honorary state regent of West Virginia. Mrs. Smith has been honored with the office of president of the Parkersburg Woman’s club, and perhaps one of her greatest honors was to represent West Virginia at the Pas-Anglican congress in London 1908 with an appointment by the Rt. Rev. Peterkin of the diocese of West Virginia. The home of Mr. and Mrs. Smith, “the Snuggery” stands for the same gracious charm of hospitality noted in other homes of the family.
. In 1880 they were living with the Sr. Smith family and William was a hardware merchant. The W. H. Smith Hardware Store in Parkersburg was started by his father and is now the Oil and Gas Museum located across from the back of the courthouse. The building first constructed in 1874 and rebuilt in 1899 after a fire, has just recently been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. It has been a museum since 1989 and now houses three floors of memorabilia depicting the history of the oil and gas industry in West Virginia and southeastern Ohio. Smith Hardware Company is still in business and is located on West Virginia 95, operated by the same extended family since its origin. The oldest theater in Parkersburg was located at 116 Third Street and was named for Columbia Jackson. In the late nineteenth century, high school graduations and town meetings were held here as well as light operas and dramatic presentations. (Parkersburg News between 1924-31)
+ 12 iv. Andrew Gardner Jackson, born 17 March 1856 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 21 March 1942 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
Will of John Jay Jackson, Sr, son of John George Jackson (7 July 1873)

Generation No. 2

2. John Jay5 Jackson (John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 04 August 1824 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 01 September 1907 in Atlantic City, Atlantic County, New Jersey. Burial: 05 September 1907, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Caroline Catharine Glime [line was originally Gleim] 08 July 1847 in West Alexander, Washington County, Pennsylvania. She was born 1827 in Carlisle, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, and died 14 April 1903 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. {“Carrie” was the daughter of John GLIME b.1791, and Elizabeth Unknown. John GLIME descends from George Christian GLEIM 1736-1817, and his second wife Anna Maria Mathias. George C. GLEIM served in Germantown (Philadelphia) as a Private during the Revolution. George C. Gleim’s Uncle Johann Wilhelm Ludwig Gleim was a noted poet in Germany. See link to the Gleimhaus: http://www.gleimhaus.de/ (Web site in German) From Dianne Gleim Bowders, June 13, 2008}
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In 1860 John J. was living in Parkersburg age 35, a lawyer with a real estate value at $10,000 and personal property value $5,000. Living with the family were Sarah Glime and Ellen North. On 19 July 1870 he was living in the 5th ward of Parkersburg. His real estate value was $50,000 and his personal property value $20,000. Two female white domestics were included in the household: Anna Monahon, age 20, born in Virginia and Kate Monahon, age 18, born in Virginia; One black male domestic, Warrick Norman, age 30. In 1880 John J. was age 56, born in Virginia; a United States Circuit Court judge; wife Carrie C. age 53, born in Pennsylvania and daughter Lillie J., age 32, born in Virginia. Living there also was his sister-in-law Sarah Hockaday age 42, niece Pauline Hockaday, age 12, and three servants: Edith Lewis, black female, age 16, born in Virginia (as were her parents); Lizzie Farraher, white female, age 23, born in Virginia (her parents born in Ireland); and Leonard Green, hostler, black male, age 25, born in Virginia (as were his parents).
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Interview

In the lobby of the Raleigh last evening sat a man who in some respects has had the most remarkable history of any American of this or former times- the venerable Judge John J. Jackson of Parkersburg, W. Va. When Judge Jackson resigned his office as United States district judge last March he had been continually on the bench for a period of forty-four years, lacking only a few months, a longer time than any other jurist, either Federal or State ever served. He was one of the first judges appointed by President Lincoln who chose him but not only for his ability but for his uncompromising hostility to secession. Although past fourscore, Judge Jackson is still physically active and as bright mentally as ever. With his ruddy countenance, keen blue eyes and long, snowy beard, he is a most dignified and impressive character.
‘I was from the outset a Whig in politics.’ Said the judge, in answer to a Post reporter’s queries, ‘and I still believe in the principles of the Whig party. I have never gotten over my disappointment that Henry Clay was not chosen President in 1844, and still look on it as a disgrace to the nation that he failed of election. In 1860 I was an elector on the Bell and Everett ticket and at a banquet in Richmond, when called upon to speak, uttered such strong Union sentiments that they tried to hiss me from the floor. The more they hissed, the more stoutly I proclaimed my views and finally won the applause and assent of those who tried to humiliate me.’
‘Did you miss your accustomed labors greatly, judge, after leaving the bench?’
‘For a while I hardly knew what to do with myself, but at last got resigned to the change. Now I tell my friends that I enjoy being a genteel loafer.’
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Death of Judge John J. Jackson

The “Iron Judge,” whose was hated by Unions ironically dies on Labor Day. The following Telegram From Atlantic City, New Jersey.
Telegram: Atlantic City, September 2
Dr. A. N. Frame, Parkersburg, W. Va.
Judge Jackson died this morning as a result of heart failure. Remains will leave Philadelphia tonight and will arrive at Parkersburg, Tuesday at noon. J. D. Butt
*** The death of Judge John Jay Jackson removes West Virginia’s most widely known man, unless Henry G. Davis be excepted. Since attaining maturity Judge Jackson had been in the public service. He came from a family of public men. His ancestors were public men and his younger relatives have been at the forefront of business and professional life. President Lincoln appointed Judge Jackson to the district bench because of his brave work in attempting to prevent secession, totally disregarding the fact that in the campaign of 1860 he actively opposed him. Lincoln, however, in ’61 was looking for men of iron nerve and not for political hirelings.
During his term on the bench, the longest ever served by any Federal judge, Judge Jackson probably received warmer praise and harsher criticism than any of his colleagues. In his judicial capacity, however, praise and criticism were alike to him and he was unmindful of both. When he mapped out a course which he though was right, he followed that course regardless of friends or foes. Above all he was a man who did his own thinking. Self-reliant, with supreme confidence in himself, he never hesitated in expressing opinions. Many able lawyers contend that Judge Jackson was too arbitrary and sometimes tyrannical. Possibly that may be true, but offsetting this quality was the fact that he allowed no dillydallying, no lawyers’ tricks to delay and harass litigants; the man who came to his court for justice got it promptly.
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Judge Jackson Is No More

Death has brought to a close the long career of unselfulness of one of the most distinguished men this state has ever produced. Appointed by President Lincoln to the office which he held until less than two years ago, Judge Jackson’s official career covered the entire existence of the state. Since before the civil war he has been a prominent figure in the two Virginias – and for that matter in the nation. Beginning his judicial career at the outset of the civil war, he at once achieved a national reputation, which he never lost. Whether deciding cases which grew out of the reconstruction period, following the civil war, or handling the modern problem of the strike, he seldom erred from the judicial standpoint. And few were the decisions of Judge Jackson which a higher court ever found necessary to reverse.
His knowledge of the law was most profound, his judgment unerring, his honesty unquestioned and he made in every way an ideal judge. He was an untiring worker. Men wondered even up to the time he left the bench, how Judge Jackson could accomplish so much work. Austere in manner, his somewhat gruff exterior concealed a tender heart and his acts of charity and mercy were no less frequent in official than in private life. Kindly, cordial and sympathetic, he was the friend of every one and the heart of many a moonshiner who has been tried by him will be filled with grief because of his death, no less than those eminent lawyers who have practice at his bar. Judge Jackson was a great man, a good man, and a man of the kind the state can ill afford to lose. His long life was full of usefulness and goodness and his place will not be filled.
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Will of John Jay Jackson, Jr, son of John Jay Jackson, Sr. (7 September 1907)

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Funeral Obsequies Conducted
Today over the Remains of
Judge J. J. Jackson

Witnessed by Hundreds of
His Fellow Citizens

As Well as Many who came
From a Distance

To Pay the last Tribute to
This Great Man

Judge John J. Jackson was laid to rest this afternoon in the beautiful Riverview cemetery and the last said obsequies were witnessed by hundreds of his fellow citizens in all walks of life, all desiring to pay tribute to this great and eminent man, who enjoyed such a distinguished career, one that has excited praise and admiration throughout city, state and nation, not only as a statesman and jurist but as a man.
It was one of the largest funerals ever held in the city of Parkersburg. Several places of business were closed while the funeral was in progress.
The remains were removed from the family residence at 1:30 o’clock to Trinity Episcopal church where they were placed just outside the church rail. A myriad of lovely floral offerings, beautiful pieces in many signs surrounded the casket and nearly filled the chancel. Here the remains laid in state for an hour before the services. The casket was opened and the face of Judge Jackson for the last time was a subject of general remark that the expression of the face was life like and natural, and as in a gentle sleep. The stream of people entered the side door and passed down the middle aisle, passing the casket an leaving the church by the side aisle.
At 2:30 the casket was closed and those who came to attend the funeral soon filled the church to repletion… the aisles were filled and all the vacant spaces in the auditorium, yet there was a large overflow, many being unable to get within the church and were content to stand on the outside during the service.
The service of the Episcopal church was conducted by Rt. Rev. Bishop W. Peterkin, and Rev. S. Scolly Moore, the rector of the church. It was solemn and impressive. Rev. Moore preached a brief sermon and his eloquent remarks created a deep impression….
At the conclusion of the service the remains were conveyed to Riverview cemetery where the last chapter was closed. The body was cosigned to earth beside the tomb of his beloved wife…..
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Ring Given By Late Judge John J. Jackson To Dr. A. N. Frame
Was Purchased On Day the Former Received Appointment to Bench

Dr. A. N. Frame of this city who has for many years been the family physician for the late Judge Jackson is wearing a very beautiful gold ring, which he prizes very highly, owing to the fact that the Iron Judge made him a present of it. The deceased Judge and R. Frame were staunch friends and the ring was presented the doctor at the instance of a Thanksgiving dinner given by Judge and Mrs. Jackson over to which the doctor was a guest. The ring was purchased by Judge Jackson on the day he received his appointment to the United States Circuit Court bench. It is engraved on the middle the names of J. J. Jackson and A. N. Frame.
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Mrs. John Jay Jackson
Passed Quietly Out Into Great White Light of Eternity
Death Occurred After a Protracted Illness
At Her Home on Seventh Street

This morning at eighth-thirty o’clock at her home on Seventh street, Mrs. Caroline Catherine Jackson, wife of Judge John Jay Jackson, passed away at the age of seventy-five years. She had been an invalid for almost five years and during the past year her health had been very poor and her demise was not unexpected by her family and immediate relatives. The direct cause of her death was heart failure.
With the passing away of Mrs. Jackson there was ushered out of this world a woman whose many noble attributes, whose numerous sterling qualities and strength of character blended with a great womanly sweetness, made her beloved of all who knew her. Almost her entire life was given to deeds of benevolence and there are many who will miss her.
Mrs. Jackson was born at Carlisle, Penn., and afterward removed to this city, where she spent the greater part of her life. Her maiden name was Caroline Catherine Glime. On the eighteenth day of July 1847, she was united in marriage to John Jay Jackson, of this city, who survives her, together with two children, Miss Lily Irene Jackson, who resides here and Mr. Benjamin Vinton Jackson, who resides in Washington, D. C. To all of these is extended the sincerest and most heartfelt sympathy of all who knew them.
Death came to Mrs. Jackson suddenly and without warning. Almost in an instant she slipped loose from life’s anchor and drifted into eternity. The end came while there was no one with her. She was sitting before her dressing table arranging her hair and it was there she was found by her maid upon her return from down stairs after an absence of only a few moments. There was no look of pain, no traces of misery on the aged features. Nothing but a look of perfect peace, symbolic of her whole life. Every care, every little attention that could possibly prolong life had been given her and it was due to this loving thoughtfulness probably that many years had been added to the life of one who will be so deeply missed and delayed the death that will be so sincerely deplored.
Among those who knew the deceased in her early life it is commonly remarked that she was one of the most beautiful and cultured woman of her day. It was in the prime of her glorious womanhood that John Jay Jackson met her and the culmination of that meeting came in the matrimonial union of two of the most prominent young people of that day.
Her demise is more deeply deplored than can be told. A vast circle of friends and acquaintances will miss her more than can be at the present realized and for the members of her family there will be no day in the future so bright as the days when the deceased formed a part of their daily lives.
The relatives in the east have been telegraphed for and will arrive in this city as soon as possible. Until then no funeral arrangements will be made. (Daily State Journal, April 14, 1903)
Children of John Jackson and Caroline Glime are:
13 i. Lily Irene6 Jackson, born 17 September 1848 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 09 December 1928 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
Baptism: 10 May 1849, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia4
Burial: Aft. 09 December 1928, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Cause of Death: diabetic coma5
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Lily Irene Jackson

Lily Irene Jackson, “Miss Lily,” was probably the most unique Jackson in all of Parkersburg’s elite society. She was the only daughter of Judge John Jay and Caroline Glime Jackson. She had the privilege of meeting Abraham Lincoln who had appointed her father Judge of the Western District of Virginia in 1861. A spinster, she lived her entire life in her parents’ prestigious home, “Carrinda,” on Seventh Street. In her youth she enjoyed her standing as an “aristocratic society belle” and often entertained her friends and family at lavish parties and dinners.

A Pleasant Evening. The hospitable mansion of Judge John J. Jackson was the scene of a pleasant gathering last evening. The occasion was a soiree given by Mrs. Lily Jackson to a few friends and like all her entertainments was a decided and enjoyable success. The evening was delightfully spent by the guests and the charming hostess spared no pains to add to the enjoyment of those present. At the usual hour refreshments were served to which were paid a hearty compliment. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. William H. Smith, Jr., Mrs. Small, Misses Gay Miller of Richmond, Va., Bessie Murdoch, Belle Jenkins, Nona Gambrill and Messrs. Dan R. Neal Jr., of Washington, D. C., Harry P. Camden, Talbot O. Bullock, Ritchie P. Camden and Will Dent. (Parkersburg Daily State Journal, September 2, 1884)

In 1876 she attended the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia serving as hostess for the West Virginia exhibition.
She studied in New York and “was recognized as an artist of merit. Some of her works were highly praised by art critics and sold at good prices…she excelled in painting although in sculpture her work has elicited the commendation of leading artists.” Several of her art pieces were exhibited at the Cincinnati Exposition in 1884 and the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893 where she was on the Board of Lady Managers representing West Virginia.
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A Deserved Compliment: ‘Cincinnati Times-Star’. A pretty piece of painting and one that has attracted a great deal of attention, is the Spitz dog in the Dexter Hall collection. This picture is the work of Miss Lillie I. Jackson of Parkersburg, W. Va. The same lady has on exhibition a beautifully decorated mirror, a unique, original and striking piece of work. Miss Jackson is the daughter of Judge Jackson, of the U. S. District Court of West Virginia. She has pursued her art studies with excellent effort and is a promising worker. (Daily State Journal, October 6, 1884)
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Miss Lily Jackson has received from the Cincinnati Exposition the two pictures she had on exhibition there. The exhibit which consisted of a painting of a Spitz dog and a large French glass mirror in an original design attracted much attention and received very favorable press notices. (Daily State Journal, October 18, 1884.)
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Her skills as an accomplished horsewoman were displayed during the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893.
Miss Lily I. Jackson handled the ribbons on the tally ho couch the other day in Chicago driving a number of World’s Fair officials from the city to Jackson Park. The Chicago papers contain a long account of the skillful manner in which she handled the spirited team of four horses, driving through the crowded streets without mishap.
In her will she bequeathed a few of her pictures to relatives but the bulk were left to the City of Parkersburg with the following conditions:

ITEM 24. IF the City of Parkersburg will accept and provide a suitable place for my pictures, not otherwise disposed of herein, I will them to the City, with the understanding they are to form and be a part of a public gallery to be in my name, “The Lily Irene Jackson Gallery.” Should they not be accepted upon these conditions by the City within one year after my death, I will that they be sold and the proceeds placed to the credit of my estate. I except from this bequest the picture of cattle by Thoreau, and the antique picture painted and embroidered on silk.
As there is no gallery so named in Parkersburg it is assumed the city declined her proposal and her pictures were sold at auction. Some have found a home in the residences of Jackson descendants and of late some have been found at yard sales. Five of her dog paintings are now owned by the Blennerhassett Museum in Parkersburg.
Her popularity in Parkersburg never waned and she enjoyed the privileges of the upper crust of society lifelong.
She had a box at the Camden Theater and attended regularly. Unfortunately she was somewhat deaf and couldn’t hear the actors, in spite of the ear trumpet that was her constant companion. Throughout the performance she conversed loudly with guests in her box. Theater-goers were often more interested in her chit-chat and gossip than what was happening onstage. She was imperious and took for granted her status in the community. On one occasion she marched up the stairs, thumping her cane loudly on each step, to the second floor office of a local dentist. She opened the inner door and demanded to see him immediately. A stammering attendant explained that she had no appointment and the waiting room was full. Lily Irene charged into the treatment room and was seen by the dentist anyway. None of the other patients uttered a single complaint.” Strum, Philip W., A River To Cross, The Bicentennial History of Wood County, West Virginia, 1799-1999.)
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Lily I. Jackson Died Sunday A.M.
Parkersburg Belle of Civil War Days Passes Away At Family Home

Death coming Sunday morning at her home on Seventh street, removed at the age of eighty years, Miss Lily Irene Jackson, long identified with the social life of Parkersburg and by family connections with the history of the state. She had been ill for several years but an excellent constitution and indomitable will helped her to rally from the attacks and she would take up again with fresh interest the lines of life. A particularly severe recurrence of the malady attacked her two weeks ago and for several days her condition was considered critical and it was known Saturday that she could not recover.
Miss Jackson celebrated her eightieth birthday September 17. She was born in 1848 in Parkersburg, the daughter of Judge John Jay Jackson and of Carrie Glime Jackson. Her grandfather was General John Jay Jackson; an uncle, Jacob Beeson Jackson, was a governor of West Virginia and another Burial: Aft. 09 December 1928, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
Cause of Death: diabetic coma5
uncle, James Monroe Jackson, was for many years judge of the fifth judicial circuit.
Judge John Jay Jackson had received his commission from Abraham Lincoln and she was fond of telling of her father taking her when but a young girl to visit the president and of his kindly reception of her. She also had many interesting memories of the Civil War, as the home of Judge and Mrs. Jackson then, and during the remainder of their lives was visited by many distinguished men and women.
Miss Jackson was a belle in her day and her reign as such continued for many years past that generally accorded to belledom. An expert horsewoman, she loved horses and dogs, and this love was expressed in numerous excellent portraits of her pets made by her, her artistic gift being above the ordinary. During the world fair in Chicago in 1893 she was a member of the board of lady managers from West Virginia, having charge of the West Virginia building and was recognized as one of the most charming and efficient among the hostesses. She was an honorary vice president of the Pan Hellenic exposition and had served in other positions of honor and trust during her long life.
She grew old gracefully, if indeed she ever grew old, was never so happy as when she had her friends about her and she never lost her charm as a conversationalist or her sense of humor. While she loved the present, in recent years her thoughts were often with those who had gone before her into eternity and there was no shrinking from death in her soul. Judge and Mrs. Jackson died many years ago and the death of her only brother, Benjamin Vinton Jackson, removed the last of her immediate family from her life, her surviving relatives being her brother’s daughters, Mrs. A. W. Allison and Mrs. C. T. Ford, both of Washington, D.C., a great niece, Mrs. Hazel T. Cronin of Chicago, and a great nephew, Charles Jackson Ford of Washington, D.C. She has in addition to these relatives a number of cousins living in Parkersburg and others outside of the city.
Her niece, Mrs. Allison, had been at her bedside for several days and other relatives are expected for the funeral which will be held Tuesday at 2 o’clock at Trinity Episcopal Church, of which she was a life-long member. Services will be conducted by Dr. S. Scollay Moore, rector emeritus, and burial will be made in the family plot in Riverview cemetery.
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Will of Lily Irene Jackson, dau. of John Jay Jackson, Jr. (15 December 1928)
 
+ 14 ii. Benjamin Vinton Jackson, born March 1851 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died Aft. 14 April 1903 in Washington, DC.

3. James Monroe5 Jackson (John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 03 December 1825 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 14 February 1901 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 14 February 1901, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Education: 1845, Graduate of Princeton College. Will: 12 April 1899, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; Will: Admitted to probate February 19, 19016. He married (1) Helen Sophia Seely 05 October 1851 in Warren, Trumbull County, Ohio, daughter of Sylvanus Seely and J. Jackson. Burial: Aft. 06 June 1861, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She was born 06 September 1827 in Warren, Trumbull County, Ohio, and died 06 June 1861 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married (2) Lucy Fearing Kincheloe 16 February 1864 in Wood County, (West) Virginia. She was born 06 May 1838 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 30 May 1918 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: 01 June 1918, I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Obituary: Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia

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Obit:
Judge J. M. Jackson
Passed Away Early This Morning At His Home
*****
After A Life Of Usefulness
For More than a Quarter Of the Century Last Past
He Sat as a Judge on the Bench
*****
He Died of Pneumonia and Complications Following Grip
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Judge James Monroe Jackson died at his home on Seventh street this morning at ten minutes before seven o’clock.
For several days his condition had been critical and several times before the end came his life had been despaired of but his splendid constitution was such that he rallied unexpectedly several times and the hand of death was stayed by his wonderful strength. On Wednesday he rallied and became so much better that his physicians were encouraged to hope that he might possibly recover. But about one o’clock this morning he grew worse and sank steadily till the end came just at the dawn of day.
The illness, which terminated in the death of Judge J. M. Jackson dates from a period several years ago, when he contracted the grip, which has returned to him every winter. He was taken sick soon after Christmas with the grip, which kept him confined to the house and eventually caused complications which resulted in his death. His throat became affected and then his lungs, pneumonia resulting.
Throughout his long and trying illness Judge Jackson remained mentally strong. His mind was at all times perfectly clear and he realized toward the last that his end was near. His last words this morning when he felt that he could not live much longer were these: “I would like to live two or three years more, but I can not. I am not afraid of death. I have tried to live an honest and upright life. I thank my friends for their kindnesses to me.”
He tried to live an honest and upright life, he said, and right well did he succeed. He was a man whom the community can ill afford to lose and who will be mourned by many warm and devoted friends.
The funeral will occur on Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock at Trinity church, the services being conducted by Rev. Dr. Moore. The pallbearers have not yet been announced.
Judge James Monroe Jackson came of a distinguished family and one which has been very prominent in the affairs of the state. He was a son of the late General John Jay Jackson, a conspicuous figure in the early affairs of this section of the state, by his first wife who was Miss Emma G. Beeson, a daughter of Col. Jacob Beeson of this county, and was a cousin of General “Stonewall” Jackson. He was one of a trio of distinguished brothers who have all achieved honor and distinction in West Virginia and have been numbered among its greatest men. One of the three is Judge John J. Jackson, who was appointed to the Federal bench by President Lincoln in 1863 and has served continuously since then as Judge of the District Court of West Virginia, having served longer than any other person who ever sat on the federal bench. Another brother was the late Ex-Governor Jacob Beeson Jackson who was one of the ablest and strongest governors the state ever had serving from 1881-1885.
Judge J. M. Jackson was born in Parkersburg then in Virginia December 2, 1825 and resided here all his long and eventful life. His life was largely given up to public service and throughout his long service of the people his career has been honorable. He has never failed in any of the duties which the state or the public has imposed upon him and his triumphal re-election to the bench two years ago in the face of a large majority given to other candidates on the opposing ticket, attests the esteem in which he was held by the people of his native county, regardless of party.
Graduating from Princeton College in his twentieth year, after a careful preparation for college, he at once took up the study of the law and after two years study of the law under the direction of his father he was admitted to the bar of Wood county in 1847 and practiced as a partner of his father. He attained a high standing at the bar at an early age, his keen perception and his knowledge of the law attracting attention while he was still a young man. In 1856 he was elected to the office of prosecuting attorney and at the end of his term of office he was re-elected. He was elected to the legislature in 1870 and served that year and the following year after the capitol was removed to Charleston, having in the mean time been re-elected. He took an active part in legislation and many of the laws now in the state books were prepared or guided in their course by him. When the constitutional convention of 1873 was called he was elected a delegate to it and in framing the organic law of the state under which we are still living, he took a conspicuous part, his legal ability and learning fitting him especially for the work.
In 1872, at the October election he was elected Judge of the Circuit Court, the circuit controlling the counties of Tyler, Pleasants, Ritchie, Wood, Wirt and Calhoun. He was on the bench for sixteen years having been re-elected in 1880 and resigning in 1888 in order to accept the nomination for congress from the fourth district. His opponent was the late Charles B. Smith of this city and the election was very closely contested and disputed. Governor Wilson issued a certificate of election to Judge Jackson, but he was unseated by the Republican congress a few weeks after he had taken seat and Mr. Smith was declared by the house to have been elected.
When the law creating the criminal court of Wood county was passed Governor Fleming appointed Judge Jackson to the bench in that court in 1891. He was elected to succeed himself in 1892 and was again in 1898. He was serving his tenth year upon the Criminal Court bench at the time of his death and the twenty-sixth year of his judgeship in the two courts.
As a jurist he was regarded as one of the ablest men in the state. He was courteous and fair under all circumstances and firm in the discharge of his duty at all times. He could never be swerved from the path of duty as he saw it, yet no one ever complained of unfair treatment at his hands. He was a close student of the law and stood in the foremost rank at the bar as a lawyer. As an advocate before a jury he had no superior in this part of the state. His knowledge of the law, his uniform courtesy, his firmness and devotion to duty, his keen perception and knowledge of human nature made him a most excellent Judge.
Judge Jackson was twice married, his first wife being Miss Helen Seely, of Warren, Ohio by whom he had five children, three of whom survive – J. M. Jackson Jr., and Mrs. Mary E. Rathbone, of this city, and Mrs. Kate I. Moffett, of Chicago. He second wife, who survives him, was Miss Lucy F. Kincheloe of this city.
Judge Jackson had accumulated a good deal of property and was interested in several very desirable pieces of property in this city, notably the Jackson hotel and the Monroe hotel properties. He was at the time of his death and had been for some years the president of the Little Kanawha Navigation Co., and was identified with several business concerns in the city. (Parkersburg Sentinel, February 14, 1901)

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James Monroe Jackson Home

One of Parkersburg’s famous landmarks, the old Jackson home at 313 Seventh Street around which was centered the city’s social life in aristocratic circles in the post Civil War days is being demolished to make way for new construction work. The famous old mansion, situated on Seventh Street in the rear of the Union Trust building, is being torn down preparatory to the construction of a gasoline service station by The South Penn Oil Company, and the demolition of the building removes a landmark whose history dates back almost 100 years.
As far as records can disclose, the three-story 12 room mansion was constructed about 1838-1840 by a Mr. Lavassor [sic] and was bought in 1848 by the father of Judge J. M. Jackson for his son at the time the latter was married to Helen Seely. The mansion remained the home of the Jackson family thereafter for more than 60 years. It was in this mansion that J. M. Jackson Jr., Mrs. James A. Moffett and Mrs. Mary Rathbone were born and the home became the center of Parkersburg’s social whirl for many years after the Civil War.
When the father of Judge Jackson bought the home, he constructed an addition in the rear of the mansion, but no changes were made to the residence at any later periods. The mansion remained the Jackson home until about 1913, following the death of the widow of J. M. Jackson, Jr., and it was then sold by the executors of the estate to the late John Samuel, whose heirs still own the property.
After the mansion was given up as the Jackson home more than 20 years ago, it had been used as a rooming house and later as a club house. Most of the beauty of the interior had been stripped many years ago, although considerable rich mahogany woodwork was found inside this week as the contractors demolished the home. On the top floor was found a 50-gallon hand-riveted tank used by water supply in the home many years ago before the city had its municipal water system.
The home was one of the oldest in the downtown district and was one of a number of mansions built on Seventh Street east of Market before the Civil War period, when Parkersburg was still a part of old Virginia. Many of these homes previously had given way to the rapidly expanding downtown business district. (Unidentified Parkersburg newspaper, 1935)

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Memorial
Fountain in Honor of the Late Judge J. M. Jackson
to be Erected at Once

The memorial fountain to be erected in front of the court house by the children of the late Judge James Monroe Jackson will be placed in position at once. Mr. Michael Ryan, of New York, who designed and executed the work, having arrived in the city for the purpose of superintending its erection.
The fountain, complete, has arrived and the work of constructing this monument will proceed without delay. It will be eighteen feet high, ornamented by a bronze bust of the honored Judge. The basin at the base of the shaft that carries the bust will be fifteen feet in diameter, of the finest marble.
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Obit: Lucy Jackson
Jackson is Taken by Death.

At her home on Seventh Street, May 30, Mrs. Lucy F. Jackson, widow of Judge I. M. Jackson, entered into eternal rest. She was born in Parkersburg, May 6, 1838, the daughter of George W. and Hannah Rebecca Kincheloe, a prominent pioneer family of West Virginia, her father being one of the early sheriffs of Wood county.
Mrs. Jckson spent her entire life in Parkersburg and acquired a large circle of friends. The new high school is situated on a portion of the farm inherited by Mrs. Jackson from her father.
She is survived by her sister, Mrs. Ione Gambrill and a nephew, George Kincheloe Gambrill, of this city, three nieces, Mrs. S. B. Moody and Mrs. J. F. Gambrill, of La Grange, Ill. and Mrs. C. Ross Jones, of Morgantown, W. Va.
The funeral services will be held at the residence Saturday afternoon, June 1, and private. Interment will be made in the mausoleum at the Odd Fellows cemetery. Her death was due to old age. She is mourned by a large number of friends who loved and esteemed her because of her virtue and loveliness.

Children of James Jackson and Helen Seely are:
15 i. Lide6 Jackson, born 07 May 1850 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia; died 07 April 1861 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia. Burial: Aft. 07 April 1861, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
16 ii. John J. Jackson, born 29 August 1852 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia; died 07 February 1854 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia. He died of white swelling at 1y5m9d.
+ 17 iii. Mary Emma Jackson, born 02 October 1853 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 12 June 1932 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
+ 18 iv. James Monroe Jackson, born 19 March 1855 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 23 June 1903 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
+ 19 v. Katherine Ingersoll Jackson, born 22 March 1857 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died Aft. 1923.
20 vi. Eliza Jackson, born 18 May 1859 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia; died April 1860 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia. Baptism: April 18607 -“The child ill – died shortly aftwards”
21 vii. John J. “Johnnie” Jackson, born 10 May 1861 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia; died 07 February 1877 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia

4. Eliza Clinch5 Jackson (John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 22 October 1827 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 07 March 1851 in Parkersburg, Wood County, (West) Virginia. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She was born in the old Jackson home on Fourth Street. She married Josiah S. Dickinson. He was born 1815 in Oneida Lake, New York, and died 16 January 1899 in Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon. After Eliza’s death Josiah married again and migrated to Oregon. He died 16 January 1899 near Portland, Oregon. He was buried in the Riverview Cemetery in Portland. Burial: Aft. 16 January 1899, Riverview Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah County, Oregon

***
Eliza C. Jackson
by Stephen C. Shaw
 
The third child of Gen. John Jay and Emma Beeson Jackson was his daughter, the late Mrs. Eliza C. Dickinson born in Parkersburg on the 22d day of October, 1827.
In her youthful years she shared the educational advantage of the best schools of the Town. Her honored father placed her in that justly celebrated female institution of learning, at Elicotts Mills, Patapsco, Md., taught by the late Mrs. Almyra Phelps, where she graduated with distinguished honor.
Nature had endowed her with an amiable disposition and an enquiring mind, a love for study and books, especially those that enlightened and gave vigor and strength to the understanding, and aided in developing the nobler and better feelings and emotions of the heart.
When her years were blushing into young womanhood she displayed those quick emotional feelings of her nature in her frequent visits to the homes of sickness, and distress in our town, and with true womanly simplicity and kindness of heart, she put forth the hand of relief. In these frequent acts of devotion to the sick and suffering in this community, the writer of these sketches speaks of her from personal knowledge and desires to leave here a tribute of grateful acknowledgement to her memory.
On the 27th of July 1846 she was united in marriage with Mr. Josiah S. Dickinson, a gentleman then engaged in business in this county, by the late Rev. William Armstrong, then Rector of St. Mathews P. Episcopal Church of the City of Wheeling, Va. Two children were born to them, of whom one only, her son John, survived her.
But the years of her hopeful and promising young womanhood, with all their bright anticipations of usefulness, in devotion to duty, were numbered and were ebbing to their close. On the 7th day of March 1850, the summons of death came, and the wavering tides of life ceased to flow. In the thirty-fourth year of her age, she passed from among the living of earth, to that undiscovered realm – “to that bourn from whence there is no return”. Her remains rest near her mother’s and other relatives, in the cemetery overlooking the Ohio river.
Mr. Josiah S. Dickenson was a native of the State of New York and settled in this County, about the year 1845. In 1846, through his influence and energy, Parkersburg Lodge No. 37 of the I.O.O.F. was chartered and organized and entered upon its career of usefulness. In those years he was an active and efficient member of the order. Not long after the death of his companion he emigrated and settled near Portland, then in the Territory of Oregon, where he again married and still resides.
When his son John, by his first wife, was arriving to the years of young manhood, his grandfather, Gen. J. J. Jackson, sent for him and placed him in the Military school at Lexington, Virginia. After he had completed his education he chose and studied law for his profession and is now settled and engaged in the practice in the city of San Francisco, in the State of California.
***
Obit for Josiah S. Dickinson

The funeral of Josiah S. Dickinson, who died January 16, took place yesterday afternoon from the home of his daughter, 312 Cherry street, east Side, and was largely attended by the friends of the family. Many of the old-timers were also present. Rev. G. W. Gue, D. D. of the Methodist church conducted the services. At the conclusion the remains were conveyed to the Riverview cemetery and buried by the side of his wife who died June 15,1898.
Mr. Dickinson was a pioneer of 1853 and his wife was a pioneer of 1852, she having arrived in Oregon one year ahead of her husband. The former was born on Oneida Lake, New York, in 1815 and was 83 years and 10 months old. The cause of his death was paralysis. When 12 years old he moved to Parkersville, [Parkersburg] W.Va., where he engaged in the mercantile business in which he was very successful. He was married and had two sons by his first wife, one of whom John H. Dickinson, of San Francisco, still lives, the other son and his mother having died in West Virginia. In 1852 he moved to California where he remained one year and then pushed on to Oregon where he arrived in 1853, settling at Portland. He was married to Miss Martha Ann King, who came with her parents to Oregon in 1852 and they moved on to a farm six miles southwest of Portland. Here they lived for 20 years and reared a large family of 10 children, nine of whom are living in this city at present. Prior to moving to his farm he had a large store in the early days in Portland and was a man of considerable importance politically. It was largely through him that the Bishop Scott Academy was located in Portland. His wife was born May 18, 1833 and was 65 years old at the time of her death. Since her death Mr. Dickinson continued to decline in health.
The surviving children are as follows: John H. Dickinson, of San Francisco: Charles T. Dickinson, Mrs. W. M. Simpson, Mrs. J. O. Rigg, Mrs. J. H. James, Mrs. E. S. Miller, Mrs. R. I. Cate, Mrs. F. H. Flemming, Miss N. A. Dickinson and Mrs. H. C. Manela of Portland. John H. Dickinson is a prominent attorney of San Francisco and defended Durrant. He is also a very prominent politician.

Children of Eliza Jackson and Josiah Dickinson are:
22 i. Baby Dickinson6, died Bef. 07 March 1851 in West Virginia.
+ 23 ii. John Henry Dickinson, born 08 April 1849 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 22 August 1909 in Healdsburg, Sonoma County, California.

5. Jacob Beeson5 Jackson (John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 06 April 1829 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 11 December 1893 in Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: 13 December 1893, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Marie Antoniette Willard 05 June 1855 in Pleasants County, (West) Virginia. She was born about 1829 in Virginia, and died 28 February 1910 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
***
He was Governor of West Virginia from 1881 to 1885, and a lawyer. Parkersburg was divided during the Civil War – Jacob Beeson was arrested and imprisoned at Atheneum Prison in Wheeling for making disloyal utterances. He did redeem his political career but only after 1870 when the Democrats gained control of the state.
****
Jacob Beeson Jackson
By Stephen C. Shaw

In further continuing these brief sketches of the descendants of the late Col. Jacob Beeson of this county we here have the pleasure of introducing to the reader our respected citizen, the Hon. Jacob Beeson Jackson, the fourth child and third son of Gen. John J. Jackson born at Parkersburg on the 6th day of April 1829. He inherited a strong athletic constitution, a thoughtful, reflective mind, of more than ordinary grasp and capacity of investigation. The victor of his intellectual faculties are displayed with great force when the subject of thought or investigation required an analytical exposition.
In his personal appearance, general bearing and constitutional temperament he is said, by those who are qualified to judge, to bear a striking resemblance to his worthy grandfather, after whom he had the honor of being named, though a full size larger in person.
With his elder brothers his youthful years were spent in the common schools of the town and during their vacations upon the farm of his father in its vicinity. He completed his educational course of study at the “Parkersburg Institute,” a school in its day of high order and of great celebrity; instituted and under the immediate supervision and control of the late Rev. Festus Hanks, who was the first Pastor of the Presbyterian Church established in this community and as a scholar and educator of youths had but few equals in the land.
In continuing this account of our honored friend Mr. Jacob Beeson Jackson we would state that at the age of twenty he chose and commenced the study of the law as his profession in the law office of his venerable father under his and his brothers instruction and completed his studies so as to pass an examination and receive a license to practice his profession from the Hon. Judges, David McComas, George H. Lee and Joseph L. Fry in the month of March 1853.
He immediately settled and commenced the practice of law at St. Marys in Pleasants County and in the courts of the surrounding counties. At the bar as a practitioner he soon disclosed to the courts and juries of the country a thorough knowledge of the great fundamental principles upon which the profession of law is based and by the power and force of his intellect and strength of argument combined with his well balanced mind he soon placed himself in the foremost ranks of the legal profession.
In the fall of 1875 he was elected to a seat in the Legislature of the State of West Virginia and was appointed Chairman of the Committee of the Judiciary. This was an appropriate field for his labors in that honorable body and he displayed his abilities as a constitutional lawyer in the revisions and perfecting of the Statute laws of the State. His study and investigation of the great science of jurisprudence is thorough, not superficial, mastering the deep fundamental principles upon which the laws are based. To the analysis of Common Law and its principles he brings to the task the patient investigation of a strong, matured intellect and a well balanced mind and the clearness of her perceptions is seen in his arguments.
On the 5th of June 1855 he had the happiness of forming a marriage alliance with Miss Maria Willard, second daughter of the late Mr. Benjamin Willard of Pleasants County, W. Va., and first cousin to the late Thomas Jonathan (Stonewall) Jackson whose brilliant exploits and military fame swept like a comet’s glare across the civilized world. In the features of her face and the expression of her countenance there is a strong and marked resemblance between her and her illustrious cousin. One child has been born to them, a son now in his seventeenth year who is attending the Episcopal High School near Alexandria, Virginia.
The residence of Mr. Jackson is pleasantly located on the west side of Pike Street [Seventh] at its intersection with Avery street on the north in our city. The grounds around his mansion are tastefully arranged and beautiful with flowering shrubs
and plants showing refinement of taste and a love for the beautiful in the mistress of the situation. It is one of those home retreats that goes far in making up the domestic joys of life to a man whose life is brought in mental conflict at the bar and in Courts of Justice with his compeers.
In bringing this brief sketch of our honored citizen to a close we are pleased in having the liberty of remarking that as a legal counselor at the bar but few if any of his profession in our state command a wider influence, or whose range of legal attainments are superior to his calm, courteous and dignified at the bar, he maintains his cause against his opponents with strength and force of argument drawn by his capacity to grasp and analyze the subject in dispute.
He is now in the bright meridian of his intellectual attainments and usefulness with a bright future before him qualified to fill with honor the position of a jurist and statesman in the wide fields of our republican institutions.
***
Obit:
Cause of Death: Heart failure

Notes for Marie Antoniette Willard:
EX-GOV. JACKSON
Dies Suddenly of Apoplexy
At Home in Parkersburg
____
Dissolution Without Warning
_____
He is Taken Ill on the Street and
Hurries to His Residence
_______
Where He Passes Quietly Away
While Sitting in His Easy Chair Before the Fire in His Library
The Last Words Spoken to His Wife
Mr. Jackson’s Career from Boyhood to the Grave
The Traits of Character that Made Him One of the Most Popular Citizens of West Virginia
His Election and Record as Governor
An Intense Partisan But Numbered Among His Friends Men of All Parties.

Special Dispatch to the Intelligencer

Parkersburg, W. Va., Dec. 11 – Ex-Governor J. B. Jackson died suddenly this afternoon at his home in this city. His death is a tremendous shock to the community. It came without warning to anyone. He was stricken down with apoplexy while sitting before the fire in his library at 2:45. The news spread rapidly, and in a few minutes the house and grounds were filled with prominent citizens. Governor Jackson ate his dinner as usual today, and after the meal he took his usual nap. He remarked two or three times during the day that he did not feel very well. About 2 o’clock he started down the street to his office. He was taken sick down town, evidently. He started home rapidly and stopped in Murdoch’s drug store on Market street, and told Mr. Murdoch to send up a doctor, as he was feeling very bad. He then started home quite briskly. He was looking very pale and the perspiration was standing on his forehead. He went into the house and seated himself in his easy chair before the fire in his library. The only words he said were addressed to Mrs. Jackson. He said to her: “My dear, I am feeling very sick.” She immediately sent a servant for a physician, but before he arrived he was dead, having expired in his chair suddenly and without a struggle. So peacefully, in fact, did his life end that his family did not know just when death came.

In Good Spirits Before His Death
The governor was down [the] street this morning, and to the casual observer was in his usual good spirits. He attended to business in his law office and was at the court house quite a long while. He seemed to be in his usual affable humor and had his well known, genial and kindly smile and a pleasant word for everybody. His brother, Judge J. M. Jackson was with him most of the morning up to noon. To him he complained of feeling a little unwell.
Mr. Jackson’s close friends had noticed for some time that his color indicated that his health was not as vigorous as it ought to be, but never a word of complaint came from him. Mrs. Jackson, his wife, and one son, William Wirt Jackson survive him.
He was as popular as he was prominent. He possessed a genial, generous and kindly disposition that attached everyone to him. He always had a pleasant word to speak, a joke to tell or a greeting to exchange. Everybody who knew him socially loved him.
Judge Boreman immediately adjourned circuit court when the news reached him. The bar will meet tomorrow to take action. The funeral arrangements have not been made. Mr. Jackson was very well-to-do and had a valuable and reliable practice; was president of the Citizens National Bank, and was interested in numerous enterprises.

Ex-Governor Jackson’s Career

From a family whose collateral branches extend into many states of the south, and whose name is not only historic but renowned and influential, destiny predetermined the subject of this sketch to become one of the executives of the state.
His immediate ancestry were noted, upon both maternal and paternal sides, among the pioneers of Wood county, and along the Ohio river, whose beautiful waves sweep noiselessly through Mississippi’s currents to gulf and father sea. Upon his father’s side are general, jurists, statesmen; upon his mother’s, who was a Beeson, and one of the oldest and most intelligent settlers of the section, was firmness, probity, amiability and mental and physical vigor. These combinations of character and constitution and innate worth manifest themselves in the career and public services of three brothers, John Jay, James Monroe, and Jacob Beeson, the youngest, imparting to each a wonderful similarity in appearance and action, yet an individual diversity which different events and connecting circumstances moulded [sic] into dissimilarity easily recognized.

His School Days

The sixth governor of our mountain state was born April 6, 1828. His early educational facilities were the best obtainable in the day of select schools, when in Virginia, with exception of the recognized poor, every parent or guardian paid for the tuition of the young entrusted to his or her care. One of these excellent schools was under the management of Rev. Festus Hanks, whose every effort aimed to inspire in the boys oratorical tastes and a desire for education to fill the highest positions in the most creditable manner. Young Jacob always “spoke his piece” at the Friday afternoon exercises with force and effect, but never was credited with unusual industry or the eloquence which manifested itself so clearly in future days and political campaigns. He read law in the office of his distinguished father, and was admitted to the bar in 1852. Departing from the county of his nativity and the assisting influences of home, he began practice in the adjoining county of Pleasants, at St. Mary’s. Genial and accommodating, he soon became popular among the voters, and was elected prosecuting attorney, which position he held acceptably eleven years.
In June 1855, he married Maria, daughter of Benjamin Willard, of Pleasants county, an accomplished and amiable lady. Their only son, William Wirt, was private secretary and since his law partner in Parkersburg, and bids fair to make an able and successful attorney.

Political Career

In 1864 he removed to Wood county and opened his law office, securing a large and remunerative clientage. In 1870 he was elected prosecuting attorney holding the office six years. Near the close of this term he was elected to the house of delegates, session of 1875, from the county of Wood, and was chairman of the committee on the judiciary. In 1879 he was elected mayor of the city of Parkersburg. As a legislator of comprehensive views and approachability he formed a more extensive personal acquaintance with leaders of public opinion over the state, and in 1880 he was enthusiastically nominated as the standard bearer of the Democratic party, and elected governor by a plurality of 16,136 votes over Honorables George C. Sturgiss, Republican, with 44,838 votes and Napoleon B. French, Greenbacker, with 13,027 votes. In this campaign, with a triangular candidacy, Mr. Jackson addressed the people in nearly every county, with telling effect, with inspiring enthusiasm, and with the disadvantage of having as competitor in the Republican nominee one of the most accomplished, logical and persuasive speakers ever upon the arena of discussion. His discharge of the important trust committed to him by the will of the people was efficient, positive and eminently satisfactory to his political friends. One of the most important questions which received his consideration during his incumbency of the executive chair, was the assessment of personal property for taxation, and what property, under the constitution, should be exempt from the burden of taxation. His celebrated assessment order provoked a wide discussion in the state, and a great diversity of opinion. His action as governor upon this question received the judicial sanction of the supreme court of the state.
At the expiration of his executive term he again resumed law practice in Parkersburg, the home of senators and governors and judges. He was one of the best and most reliable legal counselors in either of the Virginias, and was employed in important cases in the state, supreme and federal courts.
As a politician Mr. Jackson was an intense partisan, but was withal a genial gentleman and enjoyed the most intimate social relations with men of all parties, by whom he was liked for the many admirable qualities of his heart and mind. His death will be mourned by thousands of friends throughout the state, regardless of politics.

Children of Jacob Jackson and Marie Willard are:
24 i. Benjamin Willard6 Jackson, born Bet. 1855 – 1859; Died in infancy.
+ 25 ii. William Wirt Jackson, born 18 July 1860 in St. Marys, Pleasants County, (West) Virginia; died 29 January 1943 in Wood County, West Virginia.

7. Emma Beeson5 Jackson (John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 1840 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 15 January 1871 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Baptism: 17 July 18438. Burial: Aft. 15 January 1871, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married William John Dent 1863 in Wood County, West Virginia. He was born about 1838 in Virginia and died after 1871, a retired hotel keeper.
***
Emma Beeson Jackson
by Stephen C. Shaw

The sixth child of the late Mrs. Emma Beeson Jackson named in honor of her revered mother. About the year 1863 she became the wife of J. William Dent, esq., late of this city. But the duties, hopes and expectations of her wedded life were interrupted by death in 1870, leaving to her widowed companion three young children.
***
Obit:
Died – Mrs. J. Wm. Dent, d/o General J. J. Jackson, departed this life, on Sunday last at 5 o’clock, p.m. The funeral took place for the residence of Mr. Dent on the Tuesday following.
The loss to the husband, to the large circle of relations and to the little motherless orphans make strong appeals to the sympathies of this entire community.(Weekly State Journal, 19 January 1871)

Children of Emma Jackson and William Dent are:
26 i. William Jackson6 Dent, born 1865 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 01 January 1939 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 01 January 1939, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Ersie Street9; born 24 February 1887 in Indiana10; died 07 July 1981 in Wood County, West Virginia10. Burial: Aft. 07 July 1981, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
***
Wm. Dent Dies City Hospital

One of Last Members of Old, Pioneer Family Passes After Long Illness
Death took William Jackson Dent, a member of one of Parkersburg’s old pioneer families, at 7:30 0’clock Sunday evening. Mr. Dent died in the Camden-Clark hospital. He had been ill for some time.
He was the son of John William Dent and Emma Jackson Dent who was the daughter of General John J. Jackson, one of the best-known figures in the state’s earlier history.
Mr. Dent was preceded in death many years by his parents, and two sisters, Maude and Belle Dent, have been dead for a number of years also.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Ersie Dent, Gardner Jackson is an uncle and W.W. Jackson, a cousin.
Mr. Dent was a life-long resident of Parkersburg. He was associated in the real estate and oil business until his retirement several years ago. He was a member of the First Methodist Episcopal church.
Funeral arrangements have not been completed, but burial will be in the Riverview cemetery.
27 ii. Emma Bell Dent, born about 1866 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 1928 in Washington, DC. Burial: 1928, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
28 iii. Maud Dent, born about 1867 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 19 January 1901 in Washington, DC. Burial: Aft. 19 January 1901, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
***

Death of Miss Maude Dent

A telegram was received Sunday by Mrs. George W. Thompson of Seventh street, that contained information of the death of Miss Maud Dent. Garfield Hospital, Washington, D.C., was the scene of her demise, and at her bedside at the time of her death was Miss Belle Dent, the sister of the deceased.
Miss Maud Dent made her home in this city with her aunt, Mrs. America Small, of Ann street, till she became ill with tuberculosis three years ago. Then she was sent to Saranac Lake, N. Y. where she remained for many months. Subsequently, she went to Atlantic City and spent all of her time in hospitals in Eastern cities or at eastern health resorts, but the disease with which she was afflicted was fatal, and though the expert treatment she received may have prolonged her life, there was no permanency to the periods of improved health. Recently she went to Washington, to be near her sister, who resides there. She entered Garfield Hospital. Her condition became worse as time elapsed, and last week she was critically ill. Her aunt, Mrs. Small, was telegraphed to and left Saturday evening, but did not arrive in time to be at the bedside when death occurred.
The deceased was 32 years of age and was born and lived most of her life in this city, where she has many friends and acquaintances. She was a member of Trinity Episcopal Church, and in the years before her illness was active in church work in this city.
The remains will arrive here tonight, and will be taken to the Small residence. The funeral arrangements have not yet been perfected. (The State Journal, January 21. 1901)

9. Frances Belle5 Jackson (John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 18 September 1846 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 22 January 1912 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 22 January 1912, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married George Western Thompson 29 April 1869 in Wood County, West Virginia. He was born 23 June 1846 in Wheeling, Ohio County, (West) Virginia, and died 26 February 1895 in Washington, DC. Burial: Aft. 26 February 1895, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Cause of Death: typhoid pneumonia
G. W. was a merchant at the time of the marriage. He was the son of George Western Thompson (1806-1888). In 1870 George W. Thompson was living in 1st ward of Parkersburg. He was a merchant, age 24, born in Virginia. His real estate value was $8,000. Belle was age 21, born in Virginia. Living with them was Maggie Brown, white female, age 18, born in Ohio.
*****

Mrs. George W. Thompson was one of Parkersburg most charming matrons, and with her husband, made of their residence on Avery and Seventh streets a center of the social life of their day.
*****

Mrs. Thompson Answered the Final Summons Peacefully
Surrounded by the Sorrowing Family

A brief notice was given in Monday’s Sentinel of the death of Mrs. Belle F. Thompson, which occurred about three o’clock that afternoon, at the family home at the corner of Seventh and Avery streets. Her death was a shock to the members of her family, who were at the bedside when her spirit took flight and was learned with deep regret by the whole community, as she was universally esteemed for her lovely womanly traits.
Mrs. Thompson had been ill for some months past, and while her suffering was intense it was borne with resignation. Her life had been a peaceful and a happy one, and her influence for good was great.
Mrs. Thompson belonged to one of the families identified with Parkersburg’s early history. She was the daughter of the General John Jay Jackson, who for many years was one of the dominant figures in local and state affairs. She was one of a family of eleven children, four of whom now survive, they being, Mrs. America Small, who is a half sister, Henry C. Jackson, A. Gardner Jackson and Mrs. William H. Smith, all of whom reside in this city.
Mrs. Thompson was the widow of the late George W. Thompson, who with the late Senator J. N. Camden, and other capitalists, built the Ohio River Railroad, which is now a division of the great Baltimore and Ohio railroad system. Her husband was the first president of that railroad and remained at the head of it until his death occurred in 1895.
Mrs. Thompson is survived by four daughters and one son, they being Mrs. Preston Brooks Tobin, Mrs. Walter S. Cash, Mrs. Nelson Young, Mrs. Walter H. Gerwig and George W. Thompson, to all of whom the deepest sympathy is extended by the entire community.
The funeral services will be held at the family residence at 3:30 o’clock on Wednesday afternoon, which will be conducted by the Rt. Rev. Bishop G. W. Peterkin. The interment which will be at Riverview cemetery, will be private. (Parkersburg Sentinel, January 23, 1912)

Children of Frances Jackson and George Thompson are:
+ 29 i. Jeanne6 Thompson, born about 1871 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 1946 in Front Royal, Warren County, Virginia.
+ 30 ii. Elizabeth Steenrod Thompson, born 15 February 1876 in Wood County, West Virginia; died November 1974 in Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia.
+ 31 iii. George Western Thompson, born 1881 in Wood County, West Virginia; died 09 September 1945 in Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia.
+ 32 iv. Frances Belle Thompson, born 1884 in Wood County, West Virginia;
+ 33 v. Anna Camden Thompson, born 14 February 1886 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 28 January 1982 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

12. Andrew Gardner5 Jackson (John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 17 March 1856 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 21 March 1942 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 21 March 1942, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Mary P. Shattuck 24 November 1886 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She was born 30 June 1865 in Wood County, West Virginia, and died 03 November 1946 in Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 03 November 1946, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
He was an oil producer in Parkersburg around 1924. On 12 June 1900, Andrew and family were living on Jefferson Street in Parkersburg. There was one servant in the household but the information was unreadable. In 1920 they were living at 1204 Juliana Street. Andrew was age 62 and the operator of an oil company; Mary was listed as Marie S., age 54.
***

Andrew Gardner Jackson

Andrew Gardner, son of General John Jay Jackson by his second wife, Jane E.B. (Gardner) Jackson, was born at Parkersburg, West Virginia, in March 1857. He received his education in the public schools and at the University of Ohio, taking a course also at the Eastman Business College. After the completion of his studies he engaged in wholesale mercantile business in Parkersburg in which he continued for a period of fifteen years; he then became interested as a producer in the oil industry, being very successful and acquiring a position of prominence and influence in the community. He is now general manager, secretary and treasurer of the Parkersburg Builders’ Supply and Concrete Company and has become an extensive owner of real estate. Throughout his career he has devoted his best efforts to the development of the city of Parkersburg and the advancement of the municipal interests, and is now reckoned as one of its leading citizens.
In the year 1888 Mr. Jackson married Mary S., daughter of Charles and Anna Shattuck; they have one son, Charles S., of whom elsewhere and one daughter
****

Death Claims A. G. Jackson
Short Illness Ends Fatally for Prominent Resident

Andrew Gardner Jackson, prominent and esteemed resident of Parkersburg, died this morning at St. Joseph’s hospital, following a short illness, resulting from a stroke which he suffered last Tuesday.
Mr. Jackson was a member of one of the city’s distinguished old families. He resided in the Davies apartments on Eleventh street. Mrs. Clarence Cox of this city is a daughter.

Children of Andrew Jackson and Mary Shattuck are:
+ 34 i. Charles Shattuck6 Jackson, born 22 August 1887 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 27 April 1959 in Baltimore, Baltimore (city), Maryland.
+ 35 ii. Jane Gardner Jackson, born 30 September 1891 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 15 July 1984 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

Generation No. 3

14. Benjamin Vinton6 Jackson (John Jay5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born March 1851 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died Aft. 14 April 1903 in Washington, DC. Burial: 1903, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Blanche M. Worthington about 1879. She was born April 1851 in Kentucky, and died 29 September 1918 in Washington, DC.
It is believed that Benjamin Vinton Jackson and wife Blanch were living in Brooklyn, Kings (Brooklyn) New York City – Greater New York in 1880. He is recorded as Benjamin “B” Jackson, age 31 (which makes him older than he was), born in West Virginia, as were his parents. His wife Blanch was age 28, born in Kentucky, as were her parents. There were no children in 1880; however the 1920 census indicates that Laura was born about 1882 in New York and both of the girls say that their mother was born in Kentucky. Burial: Aft. 29 September 1918, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia

Children of Benjamin Jackson and Blanche Worthington are:
+ 36 i. Laura7 Jackson, born about 1882 in New York;
+ 37 ii. Carrie O. Jackson, born September 1883 in Illinois; died December 1973 in Washington, DC.
38 iii. Infant Jackson.
39 iv. Infant Jackson.

17. Mary Emma6 Jackson (James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 02 October 1853 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 12 June 1932 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 12 June 1932, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
She married Francis Vinton Rathbone 25 November 1873 in Wood County, West Virginia. He was born 08 July 1851 in Burning Springs, Wirt County, West Virginia, and died 26 September 1883 in Excelsior, Hennepin County, Minnesota.
In the 1880 census Vinton was an acid manufacturer. There was one servant. Both are buried Riverview Cemetery. In 1920 she was age 66, living with her son Monroe and family at 704 Ann Street. In 1930 she was age 76, living at 704 Ann Street in the home of her daughter-in-law, Ida V. Rathbone, age 54. Also living there was her grandson Richard, age 27, artist.
In 1885 Mary Emma was appointed to the Board of Lady Managers as President to assist in the management of the Henry Logan Children’s Home in Parkersburg. There were seventeen members and six officers. Her presidency lasted nearly half of a century, from 1885 until her death. Their rules were strict and no member could be absent without a written excuse and a fine was imposed upon a manager if she were ten minutes late or if she neglected to attend a meeting without sufficient reason.
***

Mrs. Rathbone Dies, Near 80
Member of One of Parkersburg’s Prominent Families – Famed for Her Charity Work

Mrs. Mary E. Rathbone died this morning at nine o’clock at the family residence, 704 Ann street, after an illness of several months, death thus claiming a woman much loved and respected, who during her long life had been prominent in the history of Parkersburg and whose many benefactions made her noted, her great charity and unfailing sympathy with the poor and afflicted being widely known.
Since the organization many years ago of the Henry Logan Children’s Home she had served as president of its board of lady managers and the welfare of that institution and of the orphans committed to its care were her cherished objects.
Had she lived until the twelfth of August she would have been 80 years of age and all of her life had been spent in Parkersburg. She was the elder daughter of the late Judge and Mrs. James Monroe Jackson, her father being for many years a distinguished jurist and judge. Her grandfather was General John Jay Jackson, whose family was pioneer in this section, and who took part in the convention which resulted in the formation of West Virginia as a state.
She received her education in this city, attending Miss Galbraith’s seminary, one of the earliest female academies to be conducted here, at which most of the older women of the city were educated. At 20 years of age she was married to Francis Vinton Rathbone whose family was also prominent in the early life of Parkersburg and who was connected with the local plant of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey. Mr. Rathbone died in 1883 as a result of exposure during the flood and since his death Mrs. Rathbone made her home in the family of her only son, Monroe Jackson Rathbone, who was also at the head of the Standard Oil Company for a number of years.
After his death four years ago she continued to live with her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ida Rathbone. She was a member of the Daughters of the American Pioneers, and a charter member of the Centennial chapter. Deeply religious she was affiliated with Trinity Episcopal church and was active in all its women’s societies where her counsel, sympathy and unfailing support were always to be counted on. For many years she was an active member of the Parkersburg Woman’s Club and for some time has been an honorary vice president for life, an expression of the admiration felt for her by the club members.
Mrs. Rathbone is survived by her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ida Rathbone; three grandsons, Monroe Jackson Rathbone of Baton Rouge, La., Richard Rathbone, instructor of Art at Yale, and William Vinton Rathbone of this city, and by two great-grandchildren, Monroe Jackson Rathbone Jr., and Eleanor Rathbone, children of Mr. and Mrs. Monroe Jackson Rathbone. Mrs. Margaret Paden of the Country Club is a sister-in-law, Mrs. W. H. Smith and A. G. Jackson aunt and uncle through the second marriage of General Jackson and George W. Thompson is a cousin.
She is also survived by a number of nephews and nieces, among the number: Mrs. Margaret Morgan, Miss Sophie Paden, Mrs. Kenner Stephenson of this city; Mrs. John Meisenhelder of Marietta; Mrs. Helen Barker, James S. Moffett and George Moffett of New York; Mrs. George McQuilken of Philadelphia and Mrs. Harold Mumma of West Point. Mrs. J. V. Rathbone of West Point is a sister-in-law.
Monroe Jackson Rathbone is expected to arrive Tuesday from Baton Rouge and Mrs. Helen Moffett Barker is expected Wednesday morning. The funeral probably will be held Wednesday afternoon but funeral arrangements are not wholly complete.

Child of Mary Jackson and Francis Rathbone is:
+ 40 i. Monroe Jackson7 Rathbone, born 23 July 1874 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 18 October 1928 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

18. James Monroe6 Jackson (James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 19 March 1855 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 23 June 1903 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: 1903, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Will: 03 May 1899, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; Will: Admitted to probate June 30, 190312
He married Sophia Rathbone 05 June 1883 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She was born 17 July 1859 in Burning Springs, Wirt County, West Virginia, and died 19 March 1928 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Baptism: July 1862, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia13. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Obituary: 21 March 1928, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Will: 18 December 1920.14

****
James Monroe Jackson Jr. was born in Parkersburg, West Virginia, March 19, 1855, and died at his home in that city, June 23, 1903. He was a son of the late Judge James Monroe Jackson, who died February 14, 1901.
Mr. Jackson was one of Parkersburg’s leading citizens-a thorough business man, with a wonderful capacity for handling a multiplicity of business details, an indefatigable worker, methodical in business as well as in his personal life-a capitalist and man of affairs in the fullest sense of the word. He received his education first under the instruction of Professor Nash, of Parkersburg, then in the Virginia Military Institute and Washington and Lee University, both of Lexington, Virginia. A professional career was open to him, and his father, an accomplished lawyer, would have preferred that his son should have followed in his footsteps, but James Monroe Jackson Jr. the young man was inclined to a business career, and the father would not obstruct his inclinations. Young Jackson’s first position of any particular consequence was as the New York representative of the firm of Brody & Rathbone, owners of a large acid works in Parkersburg. After several years in the metropolis Mr. Jackson returned to Parkersburg and there entered upon a business career that was soon conspicuous by its brilliant success. He became interested in a wholesale grocery business as a member of the firm of Jenkins, Jackson & Company. A few years later the firm of Shattuck, Mitchel & Jackson was formed, in the same line of business; later Mr. Mitchel dropped out, and it was continued by Shattuck & Jackson, and is in existence to-day, one of the largest and most prosperous enterprises of its kind in the Ohio Valley. In the later years of his life, Mr. Jackson became interested in banking, and was first elected vice-president of the Citizens’ National Bank, which position he held at the time of his death. He was also president of the Citizens’ Trust and Guaranty Company, and vice-president of the Union Trust and Deposit Company, to which corporation he devoted the last year of his life in reorganizing and introducing into business. He was also largely interested in the Inter-Urban Railroad Company, and was secretary of the corporation; to him is probably due more than to any other, for this great enterprise. He was also interested in a score or more of other financial and industrial corporations, and was a director in several of them.

Mr. Jackson was a communicant of Trinity Episcopal Church, and one of its most generous contributors. The splendid Rathbone Memorial organ in that edifice was the gift of himself and his wife, and Mr. Jackson left $5,000 to the city of Parkersburg for a fountain as a Jackson Memorial, and which now stands in the city park. He was a Mason, having taken the Knights Templar degrees. He was known by almost every citizen of Parkersburg, and a majority of them were known to him personally. He was a home loving man, and when not in his office was with his family. He lived a quiet methodical life, yet one of strenuous effort in midst of his voluminous business details in his office. He was loyal to his friends, and strong in his likes and dislikes. He was plainly frank, honest and above board in all his dealings with his fellow men; he prized and practiced those virtues in business as well as in social life, and detested shams, deceit and insincerity. He embodied all the elements that combine to make an ideal husband, father, and citizen.
Mr. Jackson married, June 5. 1883, Sophia Rathbone, youngest daughter of John V. and Anna Rathbone. Three children were born of this union – Anna Rathbone Jackson, now Mrs. Kenner B. Stephenson; Vinton Jackson, deceased; and Helen Seeley Jackson, now Mrs. Fred M. Cochran.

Children of James Jackson and Sophia Rathbone are:
41 i. Anna Rathbone7 Jackson, born 28 April 1885 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia15; died 02 October 1970 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia15. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Obituary: 03 October 1970, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married Kenner Boreman Stephenson 27 December 1907 in Wood County, West Virginia; born 17 August 1878 in Davisville, Wood County, West Virginia; died 25 November 1956 in Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
Anna Stephenson Dies in Hospital
Mrs. Anna Rathbone Jackson Stephenson, 1133 Market St., died Friday evening at St. Joseph Hospital following an illness of several weeks.
Born in Parkersburg on April 28, 1885, Mrs. Stephenson was the daughter of the late James M. Jackson Jr. and Sophia Rathbone Stephenson Poole.
She was married Dec. 27, 1907 to Kenner Boreman Stephenson who preceded her in death.
She was a life member of the Trinity Episcopal Church.
She is survived by Mrs. William I. Boreman, Parkersburg, a niece, Mrs. John S. Bailey Jr. of Vienna, Helen J. Bowser of Washington, DC., great nieces; great nephews, Owen C. Bowser of Washington, D.C. and Fred W. Bowser of New York, and four great-great nieces.
She was also preceded in death by a brother, John V. Jackson, one sister, Helen Cochran Bowser.

Funeral services will be held on Monday at the Trinity Episcopal Church with the Rev. Griffin C. Callahan officiating. Burial will follow in the Riverview Cemetery.
Friends will call at the Leavitt Funeral Home after 5p.m. today. Friends may consider charitable contributions in lieu of flowers.
No issue.

19. Katherine Ingersoll6 Jackson (James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 22 March 1857 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died Aft. 1923. She married James Andrew Moffett about 1883. He was born 12 April 1851 in Marlins Bottom, Pocahontas County, West Virginia, and died 25 February 1913 in Palm Beach, Palm Beach County, Florida.

James A Moffett Died Last Night in Florida
Parkersburg Man Who Acquired Fame in Business World
Was Potential in affairs of Standard Oil Company
A Genial and Unassuming Man Whom It Was a Pleasure to Know

A telegram bearing the sad news of the death of James A. Moffett at Palm Beach, Florida, at 7 o’clock Tuesday evening, was received here by relatives, and the news of his death was a matter of general regret among all the older residents who knew Mr. Moffett intimately during his early days in this city, where he made his start in the business career which carried him to the forefront and made him a potential factor in one of the greatest corporations in the world, that of the Standard Oil Company, of which he was one of the principal executive officers.

Mr. Moffett had been in ill health for some months past and was taken to Florida for the benefit of the climate and for rest from the exacting duties of his high position. He was at the home of Mr. Henry Flager, one of the prominent members of the Standard Oil Company, for sometime, surrounded by the members of his family. Mrs. Mary E. Rathbone, of this city, a sister of Mrs. Moffett. hurried there several weeks ago when disturbing messages were received here of his condition. For several days the news received from there indicated that the end was approaching, due to a general breaking down of the nervous system, with other complications and the news of his death was not entirety unexpected.

Mr. Moffett was born in Pocahontas county, this state, and was in the sixty-second year of his age. He is survived by his wife, who before marriage was Miss Kate I. Jackson, daughter of the late Judge and Mrs. James Monroe Jackson, of this city, their marriage occurring January 25, 1883. He is survived by his widow and three children, two sons, and one daughter, George and Jas. A. Moffett, Jr., and Miss Helen Moffett. A brother, Robert, who left here a number of years ago, located in the far west, where he was engaged in stock raising on a large scale for some years, but he too, afterward became affiliated with the Standard, his death occurring only a few years ago.

Mr. Moffett came to Parkersburg with his parents, Dr. and Mrs. George B. Moffett, in 1869, when the late Col. W. P. Thompson, a relative, was in charge of the plant of the Camden Oil Company, the original oil refinery of any consequence in this section at that time. Mr. Thompson was also one of the factors in the Standard Oil Company, and for a number of years before his death, after he had removed to New York, was president of the National Lead Company, one of the important branches of the Standard. Mr. Moffett was at the plant of the Camden Consolidated Oil Company for several years and was also interested in the annulling works established here by Bloede & Rathbone, when the big pulp mill, which was constructed on the Ohio river front, near where the O. R. shops now stand, was completed, and he was placed in charge, but this plant was destroyed by the flood in the Ohio several years afterwards and then abandoned. Returning to the refinery he was later called to New York by the late H. H. Rogers, where he was placed in charge of the large refinery at Brooklyn known as the Pratt Manufacturing Company. In 1888 Mr. Moffett was sent to England to represent the Standard, remaining for a year, and he was then transferred to Whiting, Indiana, where he superintended the construction and took the management of the great refinery at that place, and was in charge for a number of years of the business in the middle west, being the vice-president of the Standard Oil Company, of Indiana.

In 1901 Mr. Moffett was recalled to New York, where he was placed on the executive committee of the Standard Oil Company, and at the same time was made an official of the National Transit Company, The Ohio Oil Company, and a number of other subsidiary corporations. After the dissolution of the Standard Oil Trust he was elected as the vice-president of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, the parent concern, and was connected with the most important departments in an executive capacity, of the corporation, with the most important departments, in an executive capacity, of the corporation, of which he was recognized as one of the most potent members. He had offices at 26 Broadway, and while he was one of the busiest men connected with the great corporation, he was never too busy to see and welcome any Parkersburger when they called at his office. In fact, he always had a warm place in his heart for the people of this section, and when he took charge of the business at Whiting scores of Parkersburgers were provided with fine positions at the works or in the offices at Chicago, one of whom is county clerk Will Dudley, who was in the Chicago office for a number of years. The late P. J. Mulvey, John T. Kenny and a number of others held responsible positions there for years. His ability as an organizer and his splendid executive ability were early recognized by the Standard and it was these characteristics, coupled with a pleasing personality, that carried him to the top wave of success in the great business world. He was recognized as the highest authority, in the world in the refining of oils, a department of the business which he studied thoroughly, and was acquainted with every detail.

Mr. Moffett, during his residence in this city, was plain, unassuming and pleasant, a man of fine appearance and one who would be picked out as a leader among men. He served the city for one term as a member of council, but never took any active interest in political affairs, further than that he was a warm Democrat and was a most delightful gentleman.

It is not known what arrangements will be made for the funeral, but the supposition is that the remains will be brought to Parkersburg for interment. Relatives here expect to get definite news some time this evening concerning the arrangements for the final obsequies. (Buried in New York) Obituary: 26 February 1913, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

Children of Katherine Jackson and James Moffett are:
44 i. Helen Seeley7 Moffett, born July 1888 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; She married Harold Oakly Barker18;
45 ii. Margaret Beale Moffett, born Bef. 1900; died Bef. 1900.
46 iii. Robert Moffett, born Bef. 1900; died Bef. 1900.
47 iv. George Monroe Moffett, born October 1883 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 22 December 1951 in New York. He married Countess Odett F. F. duBourg19;
George was a food manufacturer; A. B. Princeton 1904; chairman of the board, Corn Product Refining Company; director, Commercial Solvents Corp; S. Puerto Rico Sugar Co., trustee, Central Hanover Bank & Trust Company. Home: Queenstown, Maryland; Office: 17 Battery Place, New York City.
+ 48 v. James Andrew Moffett, born 30 June 1886 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 25 March 1953 in New York.

23. John Henry6 Dickinson (Eliza Clinch5 Jackson, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 08 April 1849 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 22 August 1909 in Healdsburg, Sonoma County, California. Burial: Aft. 22 August 1909, I.O.O.F. Cemetery, San Francisco, San Francisco Co., CA, He married Annie Esther Shipman 31 December 1874. She was born about 1852 in New York, and died Aft. 1920.
He is recognized in his grandfather’s will. In the 1880 San Francisco census, living at 2422 California Street, he is listed as J. H. Dickinson, age 30, lawyer, born in Virginia, his father in New York and his mother is listed as being born in Maine (Maine is not the birthplace of his mother but may have been his step-mother’s birth state?). Living with him was his wife Annie, age 28, born in New York, as were her parents; and their son, Reginald, age 2, born in California. They had two female servants, Maria Stenson, age 40, and Ellen Waldron, age 30. He had a law office in the Palace Hotel at 402 Montgomery Avenue, San Francisco. In 1900 he was age 51, a lawyer, living in a home he owned free in Sausalito, Marin County, California. His wife Anna E. was age 44, born in NY. She had two children, one living. Reginald H. was age 22. Living with the family was John E. Beck, age 26, born in Denmark and Herman Boehman, age 36, born in Germany. In 1910 Annie E. Dickinson, widow, age 50, born in New York and son, Reginald H., age 29, born in California were living in Sanata Clara County, Los Gatos, California. In 1920 Annie E. Dickinson, age 67, born in New York is living alone back in San Francisco.
*****

General John H. Dickinson

General John H. Dickinson is one of the most conspicuous figures in the history of jurisprudence in San Francisco, having gained distinctive preferment at the bar of the central portion of his state. He entered upon practice in 1873 and his success came soon, for his equipments were unusually good, he having been a close and earnest student of the fundamental principles of law. Nature endowed him with strong mentality and he developed that persistent energy and close application without which there is no success. His advancement has been continuous and commendable, and today he is recognized as one of the leaders of his chosen profession in his adopted city.
General Dickinson was born April 8, 1849, in Parkersburg, Virginia, and is a son of Josiah S. and Mrs. (Jackson) Dickinson. The father was a merchant and came to California in pioneer days in the development of this state, arriving in the year 1850. The following year he removed to Oregon, where he engaged in merchandising and in agricultural pursuits. He attained the advanced age of eighty-three years, but his wife died when the subject of this review was only about nine months old.
General Dickinson was in his infancy when brought by his father to the Pacific coast. His education was acquired almost entirely by studying at home, his going to school being all comprised within a period of one year. [He is listed on the roster at Virginia Military Institute Class of 1870; entered August 6, 1866; left after one year ]. In 1868 he located in Benecia, California, and there became military instructor and teacher in St. Augustine’s College. He occupied that position until July 1873, and in the meantime took up the study of law, which he pursued so assiduously that he passed the supreme court examination and was licensed to practice in the spring of 1873. In August of that year he entered upon his professional career in San Francisco and gradually worked his way upward until he has now a distinctively representative clientage.

The interests which have made claims upon the time and co-operation of General Dickinson have been those for the betterment of mankind, and the improvement of his city or the welfare of his state receives his endorsement and assistance. In April 1871, he became a member of the National Guard of California, joining Company B of the First Regiment, at which time he was made captain. He was chosen colonel of the First Infantry on the 28th of June 1880, and was twice re-elected to that position, continuously serving in that capacity until 1891. In 1891 he was made brigadier general of the Second Brigade and was retired as such in May 1895, and in February 1898, was appointed major general, commanding the entire National Guard of California, a position which he still holds. He has been equally prominent in political circles and in 1879 was elected state senator, serving during the first two sessions held under the new constitution. He was also elected to represent Marin and Contra Costa counties in the sessions of 1895 and 1897.

On the 1st of January, 1875, General Dickinson was married to Miss Annie Shipmen, a daughter of Mrs. S. O. Putman, of San Francisco. To General and Mrs. Dickinson has been born one son, Reginald H., who is now conducting a ranch at Skagg’s Springs, California.

General Dickinson is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, being past-master of California Lodge No. 1, F. & A. M., and also belonging to Golden Gate Commandery, K. T., and also to the Mystic Shrine. His political allegiance has ever been given to the Republican party, and as the promoter of its interests he has left the impress of his individuality upon the political history of his adopted state. He took an active part in the incorporation of Sausalito and was president of its board of trustees during the first eight years of its existence. In the various positions of prominence in which he has been found his course has been characterized by a masterful understanding of the problems presented and by a patriotic devotion to those measures which he has believed conducive to the public good. He is popular among the political leaders of the Golden state, and at the same time in professional circles in San Francisco he occupies a position of distinction.
(History of the New California Its Resources and People, Vol 1. online research)
*****

Colonel John H. Dickinson

COLONEL JOHN H. DICKINSON, in the van of the legal profession of San Francisco, was born in Parkersburg, West Virginia, April 8, 1849, and comes of a very good family on his father’s side, being connected with the well-known Dickinson family of New York, and on his mother’ s with the Jackson’s of Virginia. His mother died when he was about a-year-old, and soon afterward his father came to this coast in engaged in farming in Oregon. In 1854 the son joined him there. When about seventeen years of age the future lawyer entered the Ohio Military Academy at Cincinnati and studied a year. Returning to Oregon, he remained there until 1868, and entered St. Augustine College at Benicia as military instructor, with the rank of Major. There he continued his studies and applied himself to the law. He was admitted to practice by the Supreme Court in April 1873, and three months later opened an office in this city, where his professional career has been signaling successful. He has applied himself particularly to mercantile and insurance practice. He is retained as attorney by H. S. Crocker & Co., about Hall Safe and Lock Co., more, Hunt & Co., Sanborn, Vail & Co., and many other prominent firms and corporations. He served with distinction in the State Senate during the legislative sessions of 1880-’81, representing the old Tenth Senatorial district. Is one of the most popular National Guard officers of the State. Was elected Captain of Company B, of the First Infantry Regiment in 1879, and re-elected two years later; and in 1880, though the junior Captain, was elected Colonel of the regiment, which he has since commanded with great ability. He belongs to the Bohemian Club, the Bar Association and the Masonic order, being Past Master of California Lodge, No. 1, F. & A. M. (The Bay of San Francisco, Vol. 1, p. 437.)

Children of John Dickinson and Annie Shipman are:
49 i. Donald Putnam7 Dickinson. Died shortly after birth.
50 ii. Reginald Harold Dickinson, born about 1878 in San Francisco, San Francisco County, California;

25. William Wirt6 Jackson (Jacob Beeson5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 18 July 1860 in St. Marys, Pleasants County, (West) Virginia, and died 29 January 1943 in Wood County, West Virginia. Baptism: 1861, St. Marys, Pleasants County, (West) Virginia.20 Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Cause of Death: cerebral hemorrhage.21 He married Bessie May Curry 01 June 1905 in Wood County, West Virginia. She was born 02 April 1878 in Gallipolis, Gallia County, Ohio, and died 09 April 1949 in Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Cause of Death: cancer of the bowels.21

The Nickel Man

The coming of the Inter-Urban Railway to Parkersburg saw businesses crop up along the streetcar line. William Wirt Jackson purchased the land that now constitutes Jackson Park and founded the Rosemar Orchard Company, which became one of the largest commercial fruit growing farms in the state. In addition the company had 30 acres planted in tomatoes, which they leased to the Imperial cannery. Later in life, Jackson rode the streetcar to the Bryn Mawr stop and walked up the road to inspect his orchards. He carried a pocketful of nickels and passed them out to the children along the way, who affectionately called him “The Nickel Man.” They had no idea he was a former bank president and son of West Virginia’s sixth governor.
***

Child of William Jackson and Bessie Curry is:
+ 51 i. William Willard7 Jackson, born 17 December 1906 in Wood County, West Virginia; died December 1979 in Wood County, West Virginia.

29. Jeanne6 “Jeanie” Thompson (Frances Belle5 Jackson, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born about 1871 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 1946 in Front Royal, Warren County, Virginia. She married Preston Brooks Tobin 29 December 1891 in Wood County, West Virginia. He was born about 1857 in Laurens County, South Carolina, and died in .

Children of Jeanne Thompson and Preston Tobin are:
52 i. Preston7 Tobin, born October 1895 in Georgia;
53 ii. Thomas Tobin, born Bet. 1900 – 1910 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia;
54 iii. Frances Jackson Tobin, born 04 November 1892 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia23; died 16 June 1993 in Bermuda23. She married Harold Mortimer Kennard about 1913; born 16 September 189223; died October 1962 in Bermuda23.
55 iv. Georgene Thompson Tobin, born Bet. July 1894 – 1895 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; She married Edward Ingham Williams 03 January 1917; born 1892 in Charleston, Charleston County, South Carolina;

30. Elizabeth Steenrod6 Thompson (Frances Belle5 Jackson, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 15 February 1876 in Wood County, West Virginia, and died November 1974 in Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia. Burial: November 1974, I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
She married (1) Walter Sellers Cash 21 October 1896 in Wood County, West Virginia. He was born August 1865 in Washington, DC or Pennsylvania. She married (2) Charles Piercy Aft. 1912. He was born 29 January 1874, and died 30 June 1948 in Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 30 June 1948, I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

Children of Elizabeth Thompson and Charles Piercy are:
56 i. Living Piercy, born 01 March 1915;
57 ii. Thompson Piercy, born 14 February 1917; died 03 August 2002 in Charleston, Kanawha County, West Virginia.
58 iii. Jackson Piercy, born 26 February 1920; died February 1983 WV

31. George Western6 Thompson (Frances Belle5 Jackson, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 1881 in Wood County, West Virginia, and died 09 September 1945 in Warrenton, Fauquier County, Virginia. Burial: Aft. 09 September 1945, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Annie D. Mehan 19 October 1912 in Wood County, West Virginia. She was born September 1888 in Wood County, West Virginia.

Children of George Thompson and Annie Mehan are:
59 i. Nancy7 Thompson, born 29 April 1916 in West Virginia; died 04 July 2000. Burial: Aft. 04 July 2000, Long Island National Cemetery, New York. She married Lucien Byington Dana; born 07 July 1914; died 14 September 1956. Burial: Aft. 19 September 614, Long Island National Cemetery, New York
60 ii. George Western Thompson, born about 1918 in West Virginia;

32. Frances Belle6 Thompson (Frances Belle5 Jackson, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 1884 in Wood County, West Virginia, and died in . She married Nelson Edgar Young 16 July 1907 in Wood County, West Virginia. He was born 1874 in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania, and died in .

Child of Frances Thompson and Nelson Young is:
61 i. Helen Thompson7 Young,

33. Anna Camden6 Thompson (Frances Belle5 Jackson, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 14 February 1886 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 28 January 1982 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 28 January 1982, Mount Olivet Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married Walter Henry Gerwig 09 January 1907, son of Edward Christian Gerwig. He was born 21 August 1882 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 30 December 1949. Burial: Aft. 30 December 1949, Mount Olivet Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

Child of Anna Thompson and Walter Gerwig is:
62 i. Walter Henry7 Gerwig, born 26 October 1910 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia25; died May 198425. He married Olive Bowman; born 20 December 191525; died 21 September 2002 in Berkeley, Alameda County, California26. He was a physician.

34. Charles Shattuck6 Jackson (Andrew Gardner5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 22 August 1887 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 27 April 1959 in Baltimore, Baltimore (city) Maryland. He married Edith Carroll Reeder 26 May 1917 in Baltimore, Baltimore (city), Maryland. She was born about 1893 in Baltimore, Baltimore (city), Maryland.

Children of Charles Jackson and Edith Reeder are:
63 i. Charles Reeder7 Jackson, born 28 May 1918 in Baltimore, Baltimore (city), MD; died 23 June 1932 in New Mexico from a fall.
Burial: Aft. 23 June 1932, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
64 ii. John Jay Jackson, born 25 December 191927; died 05 February 199627.
65 iii. Carroll Shadduck Jackson, born about 1925.

35. Jane Gardner6 Jackson (Andrew Gardner5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 30 September 1891 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 15 July 1984 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: 18 July 1984, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Obituary: 16 July 1984, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
She married Clarence Lambourne Cox 04 January 1910 in Wood County, West Virginia. He was born 06 January 1891 in Hamilton County, Ohio, and died 26 June 1954 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 26 June 1954, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

Children of Jane Jackson and Clarence Cox are:
66 i. Mary Patricia7 Cox. Died at childbirth. Burial: I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
+ 67 ii. Jean Gardner Cox, born 25 July 1921 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died Bef. 2002.
68 iii. Clarence Lambourne Cox, born 30 December 1925 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 08 February 2002 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

Generation No. 4

36. Laura7 Jackson (Benjamin Vinton6, John Jay5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born about 1882 in New York. She married (1) Arthur W. Allison29. He was born about 1880 in Washington, DC29. She married (2) Witz about 1900. In 1910 she is a widow, living with her mother in Washington DC, age 28, working in a Fish commons.
Child of Laura Jackson and Witz is:
69 i. Hazel F./T.8 Weitz, born about 1901 in Virginia; died in . She married Joseph F. Cronin about 1921; born about 1891; died in .
In Lily Jackson’s will and the 1920 census it is spelled Witz. She married a Mr. Cronin and was living in Chicago in December 1928. She was listed as Mrs. Hazel T. Cronin of Chicago in Lily Irene Jackson’s obit. There is a Hazel W. Cronin, age 30, and husband Joseph F., age 39, living in Chicago City at Bells Grove Hotel on Bryn Mawr Avenue in 1930. Hazel W. says she was married at age 21 [9 years], that she was born in Virginia and her mother was born in New York. There are no children.

37. Carrie O. Jackson7 (Benjamin Vinton6, John Jay5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born September 1883 in Illinois, and died December 1973 in Washington, DC. She married Charles T. Ford about 1918. He was born about 1863 in Illinois.
On 10 April 1930 they were living in the Riverside Apartments in Washington, DC. She is age 47, born in Illinois. Charles’ personal property value is $100. He is age 67 and was married at age 55. Carrie is age 47 and was 35 at her marriage to Charles. Her father was born in West Virginia and her mother in Kentucky. Children:

Child of Carrie Jackson and Charles Ford is:
70 i. Charles Jackson8 Ford, born 1923 in Washington DC.
Charles received from Lily Jackson the gold loving cup given to her parents on their 50th anniversary with the condition that he would pass it down. In December 1928 he was living in Washington, DC.

40. Monroe Jackson7 Rathbone (Mary Emma6 Jackson, James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 23 July 1874 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 18 October 1928 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 18 October 1928, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Ida Virginia Welch 19 October 1898 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia30,31. She was born 09 December 1872 in Keyser, Mineral County, West Virginia, and died 18 February 1956 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
****

Monroe J. Rathbone Died This Morning
Manager of Standard Oil Refinery Victim of Pneumonia

Monroe J. Rathbone, aged fifty-four, manager of the Parkersburg refinery of the Standard Oil Company of New Jersey for the past twenty-five years, died at 1 o’clock this morning at his home, 704 Ann street following a one week’s illness of double pneumonia.

Mr. Rathbone was taken ill during the middle of last week and he had to be confined to his bed Saturday. Physicians diagnosed the illness as double pneumonia and although in a serious condition the past two days, it was believed he had rallied somewhat yesterday, but the crisis had not passed.

The Standard Oil manager was practically a lifelong resident of Parkersburg. He was born in this city, the son of Mr. And Mrs. Francis Vinton Rathbone, prominent local family, and shortly after graduating from Virginia Military Institute when a young man he became affiliated with the Standard Oil company. Mr. Rathbone spent several years in Chicago, connected with the sales department of the company and then returned to Parkersburg as an official of the Camden refinery here. Several years later he was appointed manager and at the time he took up his new duties he was one of the youngest oil refinery heads in the country.

Taking an active part in all civic and welfare movements in Parkersburg, Mr. Rathbone’s name has long been identified with the city’s progress. He was a member of the Parkersburg lodge of Elks, the Blennerhassett and the Rotary clubs, and for a number of years had been a member and a director of the board of commerce and the community chest. During the World war Mr. Rathbone took an active part in all the Liberty loan drives and other movements during that period. He was a member of the Trinity Protestant Episcopal church. For some time he had been a director of the Citizens National bank here.

Surviving are his wife, Ida V. Rathbone; his mother, Mary E. Rathbone of this city, and three sons, Monroe J. Jr., and William Vinton, both of Baton Rouge, La., connected with the Standard Oil company of Louisiana, and Richard A., instructor in art at Yale University, New Haven, Conn. All members of the family were at Mr. Rathbone’s bedside when death occurred, the sons having been called home early this week.

The funeral services are to be held Saturday at 2:30 p.m., but the place had not been decided this morning. It will be, however, either from the home, 704 Ann Street, or the Trinity church, Fifth and Julianna streets.

Children of Monroe Rathbone and Ida Welch are:
+ 71 i. Monroe Jackson8 Rathbone, born 01 March 1900 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 02 August 1976 in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana.
72 ii. James Vinton Rathbone, born 02 July 1901 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 12 December 1901 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 12 December 1901, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
Obituary: 13 December 1901, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia

73 iii. Richard Adams Rathbone, born 06 November 1902 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia32; died 31 October 1960 in New Haven, New Haven County, CT32. Burial: Aft. 12 October 1960, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Grace Fearey 29 June 1946; born 08 June 1907 in Albany, Albany County, New York; died 2002.
He was a professor at Yale University in the Design Department and an author of poetry. Burial: 2002, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
+ 74 iv. William Vinton Rathbone, born 21 June 1904 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 17 December 1977 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

43. Helen Sophia7 Jackson (James Monroe6, James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 23 June 1891 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 17 November 1918 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Aft. 17 November 1918, I.O.O.F. Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married Fred Meals Cochran 07 June 1911 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He was born 01 February 1890 in Allentown, Allegany County, New York, and died 09 December 1958 in Orlando, Orange County, Florida.

Children of Helen Jackson and Fred Cochran are:
75 i. Anna Rathbone8 Cochran, born 27 June 1912 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia32; died 21 March 1996 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia32. She married (1) Hoblitzell; She married (2) William I. Boreman 12 June 1950 in North Carolina; born 10 January 191033; died December 1973 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia33.
+ 76 ii. Helen Jackson Cochran, born 13 July 1915 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia; died 19 March 1956 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.

48. James Andrew7 Moffett (Katherine Ingersoll6 Jackson, James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 30 June 1886 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 25 March 1953 in New York. He married (1) Adelaide Taft McMichael. She was born 04 September 1888, and died 26 October 1934. He married (2) Adelaide Kim Moran. He divorced her and married her twice.
He married (3) Irene Curley Bodde Hutton34. She died 1965.

Children of James Moffett and Adelaide McMichael are:
77 i. Robert Arkell8 Moffett born 1912 New York. He married Ruth Marion Quigley35;
78 ii. Margaret Moffett born 1913 New York. She married (1) J. F. Carlisle35;. She married (2) George J. Atwell35;
79 iii. Ruth Moffett. 1919 Connecticut. She married Johnson;
80 iv. Adelaide Moffett, born 1915 Connecticut; She married (1) William P. Buckner35; She married (2) David Brooks 13 July 1936 in New York City, New York County, New York; born about 1910; died 15 November 1936 in New York City, New York County, New York.
81 v. Jackson Andrew Moffett, born 06 August 1914 in Connecticut; died 14 June 1978 in San Francisco, San Francisco County, California.

51. William Willard7 Jackson (William Wirt6, Jacob Beeson5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 17 December 1906 in Wood County, West Virginia36, and died December 1979 in Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Caroline Downey. She was born 03 February 1907 in Mannington, Marion County, West Virginia36, and died 08 December 1991 in Wood County, West Virginia36. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia.
Children (adopted):

Children of William Jackson and Caroline Downey are:
82 i. Living Jackson.
83 ii. Frank Downey Jackson, born 04 December 1950 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia36; died 05 October 2002 in Columbus, Franklin County, Ohio36. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia
84 iii. Carol Dixon Jackson, born 26 January 1952 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia36; died 27 March 2001 in Wheeling, Ohio County, West Virginia36. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia

67. Jean Gardner7 Cox (Jane Gardner6 Jackson, Andrew Gardner5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 25 July 1921 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died Bef. 2002. She married Carle Lothian Lewis 29 December 1943. He was born 03 March 192036, and died 23 February 198836.

Children of Jean Cox and Carle Lewis are:
+ 85 i. Living8.
86 ii. Carle Lothian Lewis, born 22 November 1945;

Generation No. 5

71. Monroe Jackson8 Rathbone (Monroe Jackson7, Mary Emma6 Jackson, James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 01 March 1900 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia38, and died 02 August 1976 in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisanna38. Burial: Aft. 02 August 1976, Green Oaks Memorial Park, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Par., LA. He married Eleanor Kline Groves 22 April 1922 in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. She was born 10 November 1902 in Allentown, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania38, and died February 1982 in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisanna38. Burial: Green Oaks Memorial Park, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Par., LA

Children of Monroe Rathbone and Eleanor Groves are:
87 i. Living9.
+ 88 ii. Monroe Jackson Rathbone, born 27 June 1925 in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana; died 27 September 1998 in Wytheville, Wythe County, Virginia.

74. William Vinton8 Rathbone (Monroe Jackson7, Mary Emma6 Jackson, James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 21 June 1904 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia38, and died 17 December 1977 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia38. Burial: Aft. 17 December 1977, Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. He married Virginia Barton Smith 18 June 1929 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She was born 24 May 190438, and died August 1974 in Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisanna38. In 1930 he was an engineer with Standard Oil. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia

76. Helen Jackson8 Cochran (Helen Sophia7 Jackson, James Monroe6, James Monroe5, John Jay4, John George3, George2, John1) was born 13 July 1915 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia, and died 19 March 1956 in Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. Burial: Riverview Cemetery, Parkersburg, Wood County, West Virginia. She married Owen Park Bowser 17 September 1934 in Wellsburg, Brooke County, West Virginia. He was born 16 February 1914 in Calhoun County, West Virginia38, and died 26 December 2002 in Miami, Miami-Dade County, Florida38

Endnotes

1. Wood County, West Virginia Wills, Book 6, pp. 420-424.,
2. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 168.
3. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation., 2004), p. 183.
4. Trinity Episcopal Church, Baptisms, Vol. 1, pp. 84-85.
5. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 83.
6. Wood County, West Virginia Wills, Book 9, pp. 59-69.
7. Trinity Episcopal Church, Baptisms, Vol. 1, pp. 90-91.
8. Trinity Episcopal Church, Baptisms, Vol. 1, Page 83.
9. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 163.
10. SSDI.
11. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 162.
12. Wood County, West Virginia Wills, Book 9, pp. 288-292.
13. Trinity Episcopal Church, Baptisms, Vol. 1, pp. 92-93.
14. Wood County, West Virginia Wills, Book 38, pp. 303-307.
15. SSDI.
16. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 128.
17. Wood County, West Virginia Wills, Book 29, p. 326.
18. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 139.
19. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 135.
20. Trinity Episcopal Church, Baptisms, Vol. 1, pp. 90-91.
21. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 152.
22. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 177.
23. SSDI.
24. Social Security Death Index.
25. SSDI.
26. Social Security Death Index.
27. SSDI.
28. Social Security Death Index.
29. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 93..
30. Trinity Episcopal Church, Parkersburg, WV, Marriages, Trinity Episcopal Church, Parkersburg, WV, Vol. 2, .
31. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 109.
32. SSDI.
33. Social Security Death Index.
34. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 135.
35. Linda Brake Meyers, They Walked the Streets of Fame: The Parkersburg Jacksons, (Clarksburg, WV: The Jackson Brigade Corporation, 2004), p. 138.
36. SSDI.
37. Social Security Death Index.
38. SSDI.

Submitted by Linda B. Meyers, January 2007